“Nasa has confirmed that laptops carried to the ISS in July were infected with a virus known as…”

“Nasa has confirmed that laptops carried to the ISS in July were infected with a virus known as Gammima.AG.
The worm was first detected on Earth in August 2007 and lurks on infected machines waiting to steal login names for popular online games.
Nasa said it was not the first time computer viruses had travelled into space and it was investigating how the machines were infected.”

- BBC NEWS | Technology | Computer viruses make it to orbit (via iamdanw)
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Sebastian Thrun, MOOC skeptic

The founder of Udacity no longer thinks MOOCs are the answer, says this Fast Company article.  As for me, I’ve become more optimistic about MOOCs as I’ve talked to the people at Wisconsin who are doing them, and seen what they’ve put together.

Although Thrun initially positioned his company as “free to the world and accessible everywhere,” and aimed at “people in Africa, India, and China,” the reality is that the vast majority of people who sign up for this type of class already have bachelor’s degrees, according to Andrew Kelly, the director of the Center on Higher Education Reform at the American Enterprise Institute. “The sort of simplistic suggestion that MOOCs are going to disrupt the entire education system is very premature,” he says.

I too was surprised to learn that most people who take Wisconsin’s MOOCs are 30 and up.  But that made me really happy! Right now we put a massive amount of effort into teaching things to people who are between 18 and 21, and after they leave the building, we’re done with them (except when we mail them a brochure asking for money.)  30-year-olds know a lot more about what they want to do and what they need to know than 18-year-olds do.  55-year-olds even more so, I’ll bet.  I hope we can make higher education a life-long deal.

Oh, also:

When Thrun says this, I nearly fall out of my chair. He is arguably the most famous scientist in the world

I feel like you have to be very deeply embedded in Silicon Valley culture to type this sentence.

 


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“Synesthesia, loosely defined as the phenomenon of a sensation creating an unnatural secondary…”

Synesthesia, loosely defined as the phenomenon of a sensation creating an unnatural secondary sensation, is actually quite common; some humans perceive numbers as colors, for instance. But Psychology Today reports the story of a young Texas girl might be the only person on the planet identified to have what’s known as “mirror touch” synesthesia — where an individual feels the emotions of those around her — with machines, not humans.

The girl (who is not named to protect her identity) describes the experience as an “extra limb,” an extension of her own body, when she’s near a machine that she’s not touching — she cites cars, robots, escalators, locks, and levers as examples of mechanical objects that act as stimuli. “When watching cars crash in a movie, I feel them as they’re ripped and crush, and I usually have to turn away and cut myself off from the stimulus,” she says. Interestingly, she identifies humanoid robots as a “stranger” experience for her due to their physical similarities to her own body.



- Extreme synesthesia: Texas teenager says she can ‘feel’ the machines around her | The Verge
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40 Atavistic & Historical Adventures

Image from John Hilgart's 4CP archive

Image from John Hilgart’s 4CP archive

Recently, I compiled a list of two hundred of my favorite adventures published before the Eighties (1984–93).

Nine of the titles on that list are atavistic adventures, five are historical adventures. Also, via the following posts — Best 19th Century Adventure (1805–1903) | Best Nineteen-Oughts Adventure (1904–13) | Best Nineteen-Teens Adventure (1914–23) | Best Twenties Adventure (1924–33) | Best Thirties Adventure (1934–43) | Best Forties Adventure (1944–53) | Best Fifties Adventure (1954–63) | Best Sixties Adventure (1964–73) | Best Seventies Adventure (1974–83) — I listed another two hundred and fifty of my favorite adventures. Eleven of the titles on those secondary lists are atavistic adventures, fifteen are historical adventures.

Thus — below, please find a list of forty of my favorite atavistic and historical adventures — arranged not qualitatively (which would be impossible) but chronologically. The titles marked with an asterisk (*) are from my Top 200 Adventures list; the others are second-tier favorites.

rob roy

PS: As I noted in a post about atavistic epics, the past, in atavistic adventure novels like the twenty listed below, is a source of energy and strength; folk legends, ballads, myths, and epics are reinhabited, if only temporarily. The atavistic epic is an emotional endorsement of the virile powers of the past in defiance of the present. The atavistic epic allow readers to imagine themselves not as genteel Christians but creatures of force, splendor, and savagery; it offers sublime emotions like fear, horror, awe, enthusiasm, inspiration. And it celebrates the physical sensations denied modern man: hand to hand combat, sleeping rough, eating raw meat.

TOP 450 ADVENTURES — BY SUBGENRE: 101 Science Fiction | 70 Crime | 65 Fantasy | 60 Espionage | 40 Atavistic & Historical | 25 Frontier & Western | 20 Avenger & Artful Dodger | 20 Apophenic & Treasure Hunt | 20 War & Ruritanian | 18 Picaresque | 11 Robinsonade & Survival |

All-Story+Tarzan+1912

MORE LIT LISTS FROM THIS AUTHOR: Index to All Adventure Lists | Best 19th Century Adventure (1805–1903) | Best Nineteen-Oughts Adventure (1904–13) | Best Nineteen-Teens Adventure (1914–23) | Best Twenties Adventure (1924–33) | Best Thirties Adventure (1934–43) | Best Forties Adventure (1944–53) | Best Fifties Adventure (1954–63) | Best Sixties Adventure (1964–73) | Best Seventies Adventure (1974–83). ALSO: Best YA Fiction of 1963 | Best Scottish Fabulists | Radium-Age Telepath Lit | Radium Age Superman Lit | Radium Age Robot Lit | Radium Age Apocalypse Lit | Radium Age Eco-Catastrophe Lit | Radium Age Cover Art (1) | SF’s Best Year Ever: 1912 | Cold War “X” Fic | Best YA Sci-Fi | Hooker Lit | No-Fault Eco-Catastrophe Lit | Scrabble Lit |

*

Why does my Top Adventures List project stop in 1983? Primarily because I figure that adventure fans already know which adventure novels from the Eighties, Nineties, and Twenty-Oughts are worth reading; I’m interested in directing attention to older, sometimes obscure or forgotten adventures. Also, I have friends who’ve published adventures since 1983 — I don’t want these lists to be biased!

In chronological order, here is the list of my Top 40 Atavistic & Historical Adventures.

    THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

  1. 1817. Walter Scott’s Waverly adventure Rob Roy, in which a young Englishman travels to the Scottish Highlands in order to collect a debt stolen from his father. During his travels he encounters Rob Roy MacGregor — the folk hero and outlaw known as the Scottish Robin Hood.
  2. haggard solomon map

  3. * 1885. H. Rider Haggard’s frontier adventure King Solomon’s Mines, which set a new standard for thrills — thanks to the author’s illiberal belief that denizens of England are so coddled that they’ve forgotten their own savage nature. The first novel written in English that was based on the African continent, and the first “Lost World” adventure. NB: Haggard would write 18 books featuring Allan Quatermain, the hero of King Solomon’s Mines.
  4. * 1887. H. Rider Haggard’s treasure hunt/occult adventure She. Weird fun, particularly if you like reincarnation stuff. Spoiler: In a later novel, She and Quatermain will cross paths!
  5. m.arthur_conan_doyle_white_company_book_11a

  6. * 1891. Arthur Conan Doyle’s knightly adventure The White Company. Perhaps more of an ironic homage to than a sardonic inversion of the genre. Actually one of his best adventures!
  7. * 1891. H. Rider Haggard’s Viking adventure Eric Brighteyes. Considered one of his best books.
  8. haggard nada

  9. 1892. H. Rider Haggard’s Zulu adventure Nada the Lily. Considered one of his best books.
  10. 1894. H. Rider Haggard’s lost-race fantasy adventure The People of the Mist.
  11. london wild

  12. * 1903. Jack London’s Klondike adventure The Call of the Wild, which expresses the author’s notion that because the veneer of civilization is fragile, humans revert to a state of primitivism with ease. PS: Note that London’s White Fang shows the flipside of this trajectory.
  13. THE NINETEEN-OUGHTS (1904–13)

  14. * 1904. Jack London’s sea-going adventure The Sea Wolf. A clash of opposing philosophies, one of which — quasi-Nietzschean; more accurately Social Darwinist — is embodied by Wolf Larsen, a brutal yet enigmatic sea captain.
  15. 1904. Winston Churchill’s (the author) historical adventure The Crossing. Set during the Revolutionary War along the Kentucky frontier; Daniel Boone makes an appearance. Considered Churchill’s best novel.
  16. haggard she

  17. 1905. H. Rider Haggard’s frontier/exploration adventure Ayesha: The Return of She.
  18. 1906. Jack London’s Klondike adventure White Fang.
  19. 1906. Arthur Conan Doyle’s knightly adventure Sir Nigel. A prequel to Conan Doyle’s earlier novel The White Company. Set during the early phase of the Hundred Years’ War.
  20. london adam

  21. 1906. Jack London’s atavistic adventure Before Adam conjures up primitive man. The protagonist is Big Tooth.
  22. * 1912. Edgar Rice Burroughs’s atavistic adventure Tarzan of the Apes, serialized in All-Story Magazine. John Clayton, whose parents are marooned and killed in a jungle of equatorial Africa, is raised by apes — and becomes their king. Published in book form in 1914. Burroughs would write 24 subsequent Tarzan adventures.
  23. * 1912. H. Rider Haggard’s Marie, first installment in Haggard’s excellent Zulu/Quatermain trilogy, in which his hero Allan Quatermain becomes ensnared in the vengeance of Zikali, a Zulu wizard known as “The-thing-that-should-never-have-been-born.” A prequel to King Solomon’s Mines, et al. This was a great era for prequels.
  24. THE TEENS (1914–23)

    tarzan opar

  25. 1916. Edgar Rice Burroughs’s atavistic adventure Tarzan and the Jewels of Opar. Published in book form in 1918.
  26. 1919. Albert Payson Terhune’s YA canine adventure Lad: A Dog, set in Sunnybrook, N.J. First in a popular series, every one of which I read with solemn delight as an adolescent. It was then that I first realized that New Jersey’s hill people and “half-breeds” were up to no good.
  27. 1921. H. Rider Haggard’s Allan Quatermain adventure She and Allan.
  28. heyer moth

  29. 1921. Georgette Heyer’s historical adventure The Black Moth.
  30. 1921. Donn Byrne’s historical adventure Messer Marco Polo describes Marco Polo’s trip to China. Popular at the time.
  31. THE TWENTIES (1924–33)

    tarzan ampire

  32. 1928–29. Edgar Rice Burroughs’s atavistic Tarzan adventure Tarzan and the Lost Empire. Published in book form in 1929. Tarzan and a young German find a lost remnant of the Roman Empire hidden in the mountains of Africa. This novel is notable for the introduction of Nkima, who serves as Tarzan’s monkey companion. A sentimental favorite of mine.
  33. 1929. Richard Hughes’s A High Wind in Jamaica. Sardonic inversion.
  34. 1929. Eric P. Kelly’s YA historical adventure The Trumpeter of Krakow.
  35. nordhoff mutiny

  36. 1932. Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall’s historical sea-going adventure Mutiny on the Bounty, based on the mutiny against Lieutenant William Bligh in 1789. It was the first of what became The Bounty Trilogy. The writers lived for a number of years in Tahiti, doing research.
  37. THE THIRTIES (1934–43)

  38. * 1935–36. Robert E. Howard’s atavistic fantasy adventure Conan the Conqueror (aka The Hour of the Dragon), serialized in the pulp magazine Weird Tales, is the author’s only full-length novel about the Cimmerian who evolves from a barbarian to a mercenary and thief to conquering king. Published in book form (Gnome Press) in 1950.
  39. edmonds mohawk

  40. 1936. Walter D. Edmonds’s historical adventure Drums Along the Mohawk. Adapted into the excellent 1939 John Ford movie. Note that a selection from this novel — “Escape from the Mine” — was collected in the definitive 1945 collection The Pocket Book of Adventure Stories, ed. Philip Van Doren Stern.
  41. 1937. C.S. Forester’s Horatio Hornblower historical sea-going adventure Beat to Quarters. The book, a collection of stories, is sixth by internal chronology, but the first published by Forester. The best Hornblower book to read first. Serialized after publication, in 1938.
  42. 1940. Nevil Shute’s atavistic adventure An Old Captivity. While piloting an air survey mission of Greenland, a young Scottish pilot enters a coma in which he dreams that he was once a Scottish slave aboard Leif Ericson’s vessel on its voyage of discovery.
  43. long ships

  44. * 1941/45. Frans G. Bengtsson’s atavistic adventure The Long Ships (or Red Orm; original Swedish: Röde Orm), which is perhaps the definitive Viking novel. Set in the 10h century, the tale follows the adventures of Red Orm… and traces Scandinavia’s transformation from a pagan to a Christian civilization. Reissued by the New York Review of Books!
  45. 1943. Esther Forbes’s YA historical adventure Johnny Tremain. A young apprentice in Revolutionary Boston finds himself at the center of the action.
  46. THE FORTIES (1944–53)

    forester hornblower

  47. * 1951. C.S. Forester’s Horatio Hornblower historical sea-going adventure Lieutenant Hornblower, serialized. Probably my favorite of the series. Unique in being told from a perspective other than Hornblower’s… which allows the author to sustain a mystery about how Captain Sawyer, a paranoid schizophrenic, came to be injured. Published in book form in 1952.
  48. THE FIFTIES (1954–63)

    the-eagle-of-the-ninth-original-book-jacket-oup

  49. 1954. Rosemary Sutcliff’s YA Eagle of the Ninth historical adventure The Eagle of the Ninth.
  50. 1956. Henry Treece’s pre-historical adventure The Golden Strangers. Primitive flint-using Britons encounter warlike Indo-European invaders armies with metal weapons, in this excellent story from an author best known for his YA historical adventures about later (Viking and Roman) invaders.
  51. asterix-le-gaulois

  52. * 1959–60. René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo’s historical adventure Asterix the Gaul. The story was first published as a serial in Pilote magazine, a Franco-Belgian comics magazine founded by Goscinny and others. Published in album form in 1962. The English translation was first published in 1969.
  53. 1960–61. René Goscinny and Albert Uderzo’s historical adventure Asterix and the Golden Sickle.
  54. THE SEVENTIES (1974–83)

  55. 1976. Ishmael Reed’s historical adventure Flight to Canada. A sardonic inversion of slave narratives and earnest abolitionist novels.
  56. octavia-e-butler-kindred-book-cover-images

  57. 1979. Octavia E. Butler’s fantasy/historical adventure Kindred. A contemporary African American woman is transported to antebellum Maryland.
  58. * 1980. Umberto Eco’s historical/hermeneutic adventure The Name of the Rose, set in the early 14th century. As the Sherlock Holmes-like Franciscan friar William of Baskerville (get it?) arrives at a Benedictine monastery in Italy, several monks die under mysterious circumstances. William and his novice, Adso, explore a labyrinthine medieval library containing forbidden literature, discuss the subversive power of laughter, and confront the intolerance of the Inquisition… but is there a mystery to be discovered, after all?
  59. boyle water music

  60. * 1980. T. Coraghessan Boyle’s semi-fictional historical adventure Water Music, which follows the parallel adventures of Scottish explorer Mungo Park and a London criminal, Ned Park, in 19th-century London, Africa, and the Scottish highlands. A riotous, erudite, imaginative yarn loosely based on the real-life Mungo Park’s Travels in the Interior Districts of Africa. The author’s first novel.

***

TOP 450 ADVENTURES — BY SUBGENRE: 101 Science Fiction | 70 Crime | 65 Fantasy | 60 Espionage | 40 Atavistic & Historical | 25 Frontier & Western | 20 Avenger & Artful Dodger | 20 Apophenic & Treasure Hunt | 20 War & Ruritanian | 18 Picaresque | 11 Robinsonade & Survival |

20 ADVENTURE THEMES AND MEMES: Index to All Adventure Lists | Introduction to Adventure Themes & Memes Series | Index to Entire Series | The Robinsonade (theme: DIY) | The Robinsonade (theme: Un-Alienated Work) | The Robinsonade (theme: Cozy Catastrophe) | The Argonautica (theme: All for One, One for All) | The Argonautica (theme: Crackerjacks) | The Argonautica (theme: Argonaut Folly) | The Argonautica (theme: Beautiful Losers) | The Treasure Hunt | The Frontier Epic | The Picaresque | The Avenger Drama (theme: Secret Identity) | The Avenger Drama (theme: Self-Liberation) | The Avenger Drama (theme: Reluctant Bad-Ass) | The Atavistic Epic | The Hide-And-Go-Seek Game (theme: Artful Dodger) | The Hide-And-Go-Seek Game (theme: Conspiracy Theory) | The Hide-And-Go-Seek Game (theme: Apophenia) | The Survival Epic | The Ruritanian Fantasy | The Escapade

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Ulises Farinas and Owen Gieni’s cover to Judge Dredd:…



Ulises Farinas and Owen Gieni’s cover to Judge Dredd: Mega-City Two #2, coming in February from IDW. 

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This Lie-Detecting Throat Tattoo Is Google’s Creepiest…



This Lie-Detecting Throat Tattoo Is Google’s Creepiest Patent Yet - Alexis C. Madrigal - The Atlantic

Google has patented a new possible solution to the age old problem of talking with each in loud places: “Communication can be reasonably improved” by the application of an electronic throat tattoo, which could dampen “acoustic noise.” […]

"Optionally, the electronic skin tattoo can further include a galvanic skin response detector to detect skin resistance of a user," the patent reads. "It is contemplated that a user that may be nervous or engaging in speaking falsehoods may exhibit different galvanic skin response than a more confident, truth telling individual."

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polychroniadis: Bricktopia: Contemporary Crafts in EME3…



polychroniadis:

Bricktopia: Contemporary Crafts in EME3 Festival, Barcelona

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Artist layers 100 unique copies of The Beatles’ White Album for…



Artist layers 100 unique copies of The Beatles’ White Album for original vinyl release – The Vinyl Factory

"Not one to fret about the odd duplicate, earlier this year Houston-born Californian artist Rutherford Chang displayed his staggering collection of 693 discrete second hand copies of The Beatles’ self-titled 1968 LP, more commonly known as The White Album, at New York’s Recess Gallery. Fascinated in the differing organic and man-made ways in which the virgin sleeves aged or were deformed over time, Chang has since amassed close to 800 copies of the record, unique for their embossed “The Beatles” title and serial number, giving the impression that the album was itself limited. As it is, almost three million are thought to be in circulation.

"Slated as the final work in the exhibition, Chang has electronically overlaid 100 discrete copies of the album to create one densely layered 96-minute double LP on which each version of the iconic original brings its own sonic history to the final recording. The physical imperfections of the 45 year old records pop, skip and crackle to create an eerie heterophony as the record gradually drifts out of sync with itself over the course of each side."

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“High-frequency trading (HFT) accounted for about half of US stock-exchange trades in…”

High-frequency trading (HFT) accounted for about half of US stock-exchange trades in 2012—approximately 1.6 billion shares a day, according to estimates cited by Bloomberg Businessweek. In many ways, these algorithms mimic human traders’ transactions buying and selling stocks among themselves, though to make trades as quickly as possible, they are equipped with only the most rudimentary analytic tools. Unlike human traders, whose actions are often undergirded by real-world data like a company’s reported quarterly profits or losses, algorithms react only to real-time market movement, and some scientists and analysts now say that all their unsupervised activity might be a problem.

In September, researchers at the University of Miami published a paper that examined the effects of the widespread use of these narrowly focused algorithms. They looked at stock trades that occurred at time scales under a second, an interval at which only robots can act. They made a startling discovery: from January 2006 to February 2011, there were more than 18,000 spikes and crashes in individual stock prices that resolved themselves almost instantaneously and that have gone unnoticed until now.

Despite the market’s being able to right itself in milliseconds, these extreme fluctuations are “huge crashes,” according to Neil Johnson, the paper’s lead author.

“Not just 10 percent of a stock or 20 percent of a stock, but almost 100 percent of the value—within a second,” he said. “Even though they’re in it for themselves, [the robots] form into groups. You get this kind of mob behavior, where a whole bunch of them have exactly the same opinion at exactly the same moment. That’s why they kick in these huge spikes and crashes that you don’t see in the human world.”

Before the release of Johnson’s paper, titled “Abrupt Rise of New Machine Ecology Beyond Human Response Time,” even the companies that sent the bots out into the world were unaware of the almost imperceptible, ultrarapid downturns and upswings left in the wake of their trading decisions. While they trade much faster than humans, algorithms also share a weakness with us: groupthink. This influences not just individual stocks but occasionally entire markets—packs of robots with similar objectives competing against one another in the subsecond market sometimes start trading in a falling-domino-like fashion that can bubble up and manifest itself in the human world in a big way.



- Did Robotraders Know the Financial Crisis Was Coming? | VICE United States
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The Man with Six Senses (19)

HiLobrow is pleased to present the nineteenth installment of our serialization of Muriel Jaeger’s The Man with Six Senses. New installments will appear each Friday for 20 weeks.

When Hilda, a beautiful young member of England’s cynical postwar generation, meets Michael, a hapless mutant capable of perceiving the molecular composition of objects and the ever-shifting patterns of electromagnetic fields, she becomes his apostle. However, her efforts to convince others of the prodigy’s unique importance end disastrously; and Michael himself is slowly destroyed — mentally and physically — by his uncanny gift. In the end, Hilda must decide whether she is willing and able to make a supreme sacrifice for the sake of humankind’s future.

This early and brilliant effort to export the topic of extra-sensory perception out of folklore and occult romances and import it into science fiction was first published in 1927 — by Leonard and Virginia Woolf’s Hogarth Press. In December 2013, HiLoBooks will publish a beautiful paperback edition of this long-unattainable book — with an Introduction by Mark Kingwell.

SUBSCRIBE to HiLobrow’s serialized fiction via RSS.

ALL EXCERPTS: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20

***

So I went. I could not, after all, endure to think of her alone and in difficulties, whatever the pain of the meeting to me. But I went with deliberate effort, not as the moth back to the candle. I knew too well — no man as introspective as I am can deceive himself in such matters — that what I had loved was in the past. It could not exist now. But I was going to be horribly reminded of it.

Yet it had been, after all, so short a time since we had parted in the garden at Marling. When I thought back to it, the mood and the atmosphere of that time came back so vividly that I could almost imagine that I was still living in those days of hope and uneasiness. For a moment the gulf made by the complete overturn of sentiments, hopes and life-plans was bridged, and present realities, when they came back, would come back with a jar. It is curious how the phase of one’s life in which one has been most interested, has lived most intensely, may still dominate one’s imagination sometimes for years afterwards. It remains in some way the norm, the criterion, of subsequent experience. No doubt, psychologists will, some day measure the duration of such influences. One changes one’s body entirely in the space of seven years, it is said; perhaps, one’s brain and one’s mind change with it, so that, until time has made distinct progress with the work of transforming one into another person, the effect of strong experience cannot begin to disappear.

And, after all, my meeting with Hilda was oddly hushed. I think that in every meeting emotionally anticipated, there must be something of anticlimax. The personality which has come to loom so large in imagination appears in the form of a small, concrete, human frame, moving and talking, in the human manner, like an animated puppet. The queer flatness of human intercourse, like the notes of a harpsichord, impresses one at such moments of reunion. Then, too, Hilda, as might have been expected, had lost vitality. She spoke quietly and a little draggingly, as though she were very tired. Even her shining hair had lost something of its lustre. But she spoke straightly, and held herself erect as ever. There was no such terrible change as I had half expected.

1-women-unknown-woman-from-syria-from-archive-of-hussain-saleh-1920s

Nothing could have been less like our last tempestuous conversation. It was like the calm morning after the storm, when, with a queer sense of leisure and emptiness, one looks about to see what the damage has been. The furniture of Hilda’s Bloomsbury flat distributed about the light little cottage living-room seemed like jetsam rescued from the sea, and the little servant like a shipwrecked mariner. The unreality of an excessive commonplaceness gripped us.

After the first conventional greetings — and we were punctiliously conventional —Hilda surprised me by putting into words my own thought of herself:

“You are looking very tired, Ralph!”

I said that there was nothing wrong with me, and asked her to tell me at once how I could be of assistance to her.

She told me gravely without any trace of self-consciousness. It was a pitiful little difficulty, which wrung my heart by its sheer pettiness — simply a phase of the money trouble which I had foreseen. The illness which had preceded Michael’s death had used up all their reserves. An instalment of his tiny income was now due which, if she could get it, would be enough to help her over the crisis; but he had died intestate, and there was some delay and difficulty. The doctor would not let her go in and out of Town to see to the necessary formalities.

“The doctor!” I glanced at her in alarm. And then I understood. It was not yet certain that her sacrifice had been for nothing — nor was Michael Bristowe yet completely finished with. I hurried on before she could speak, asking questions about the business problem. I suggested that I could easily advance the money, and should be glad to do so, but she did not seem to wish that.

“It only needs someone to interview the solicitor,” she assured me. “I would go myself — but I daren’t take any risks. Almost everything is paid.… Mrs. Hastings has got a temporary substitute; but, of course, she can’t go on paying me as well in the meantime. It has made things rather difficult.… But if I can get this, I can carry on all right.” A change in her expression at the mere idea of the relief told me that the pressure was greater than she had let me know — perhaps a landlord dunning for rent, perhaps provision for immediate necessities lacking.

And it was twenty pounds! I wanted to weep for the sheer pity and irony of it. I would gladly have paid ten times as much to be spared the wrench to my feelings. But, obviously, the most helpful thing I could do was to promise that I would see the solicitor and do my best.

I added tentatively, “Your aunt? Is there any chance of her coming over soon?”

Hilda shook her head and answered my intention: “No, I can’t bring her over. She can’t stand English winters now.… But there is an old friend of mine who helps to run a nursing-home. I am going to her later on.”

I questioned her a little further as tactfully as I could. It was distressing to me to do so, the more that I felt a certain painful ludicrousness in my position; but I suspected that there was no one else who would even ask a question.

I found, as I might have expected, that her arrangements were admirable. Michael’s child was to have every chance. I divined, as we talked, though she was reticent, that Michael’s child was now the centre of all her hopes and ambitions. It must, in fact, be her sole remaining hope. That was why, even after all that she must have gone through, she showed no sign of demoralisation. She was keeping going and keeping her poise for this reason. But I felt that there was more effort in it than there had ever been before. It had become conscious. It had to be maintained against strain.

nebraska 1920s pregnant

I wondered more than ever about Michael Bristowe, and how he had conducted himself during those last months of his life. But about that I asked no questions. Her obvious fatigue was my best evidence. She told me very little about it, then or at any time, and what I learnt I gathered from allusions. For her, it must have been a life of sickening strain with no compensating touch of dignity. At times in his career, Michael Bristowe had been impressive, though always difficult and dangerous to deal with. But there was no ennobling element of dangerousness in the fretful neurasthenic that she had married. I had been sure in the old days that she had sometimes been afraid that Michael, in one of his desperate moods, might commit suicide, though the word was never mentioned between us. But the Michael Bristowe of these last days had no longer the spirit to make even a suicide. He just became more and more of a crank. There were more and more things that he could not endure. He had to be kept in an isolation that became constantly more complete, while Hilda tried to fulfil the function of vacuum chamber between him and the world. And so on, with life becoming more and more impossible, until, mercifully, he got the chill that finished him. Certainly, he went in no blaze of glory, this Messiah, not even the dark glory of a crucifixion. One can only express it in the indignity of modern slang. He fizzled out. I suppose that this is the most that we can expect of our Messiahs in this Age of Lead.

I left Hilda as soon as I reasonably could. My very spirit was sick within me. And, apart from my own feelings, I could not be sure, grotesque as the supposition seemed, that I might not strain her resources if I stayed to lunch. Nevertheless, I thought that she clung to my company a little when I came to say good-bye. Yet there was so little that I could do. She had to face alone a dreary, yet hazardous, period of waiting. I wondered, what I could never ask, whether she still thought that her experiment had been worth while. Perhaps she did, with Michael’s child to hope for. It seemed to me that she had stilled her spirit, driven fears and misgivings under by sheer force of will, in order to make smooth the path for this young prince to come into his kingdom.

XVI

Hilda’s child was born in her friend’s nursing-home early in the spring of the New Year. It was a girl. Hilda was very ill, a long dragging illness, not dangerous after the first fortnight, but a tedious weakness and disability — such an illness as she had not calculated upon, never before having had reason to distrust her magnificent health. But I suppose that nervous strain cannot always be discounted by will-power.

I was able to see her for the first time one April day when the sun was shining and the air exhilarating even in London, as it had been the day a year before when she had come to me in the garden at Marling and had predicted, or rather, one might almost say, had planned, all that had subsequently happened to her. She was in an invalid chair by the open window of a large light room looking out over a quiet West-End square of turf and budding trees. Her friend, Lettice Platt, had seen to it that she had the most favourable conditions possible. Miss Platt was a plump, plain, young woman with honest and intelligent eyes, and of the type obviously born to mother other people’s children. It had been almost with a groan of relief that I had seen Hilda safe into her competent keeping.

1920s mother

Hilda, lying back in her chair, had a look of fragility that made her strange to me. Her cheeks were pale and her manner listless. But she was evidently pleased to see me, and ready to attend to the business information that I had for her. Her illness had, of course, thrown out anew her financial calculations, and it had been necessary for me, in response to a message from her, to arrange with her own solicitors for an. advance to meet the emergency. Her face cleared, as I explained that the difficulty had been overcome.

“Lettice has been paying for me to stay on here out of her own pocket,” she explained, a slight flush disturbing her pallor; “I couldn’t have let it go on much longer.”

“You are lucky to have a friend like Miss Platt,” I remarked casually.

“I am lucky in having more than one friend who sticks to me.”

I knew that the tears standing in her eyes, and the quiver of sentiment in her voice, were only signs of physical weakness, but they were so unlike Hilda’s usual, clean-cut, controlled manner that I found myself embarrassed. I was glad that Miss Platt, entering the room with the child at the moment, made it unnecessary for me to make any reply.

I had seen Hilda’s daughter before, when I had called to enquire at the Home. By all the rules of the game, I ought to have hated the sight of the little creature with Michael’s dark eyes and hair. But this affair had been outside the rules of the game from the beginning. I found that I could not hate little Stella. She was too small and helpless. The high destiny for which she had been born (apart from which she never would have been born at all) seemed pathetic when one looked at the minute fumbling fingers which might or might not have in them the new magic sensibility. No one could tell yet. At present no one could be certain that she was not blind, or deaf, or idiot. The weight resting on her tiny personality seemed too heavy. To me, it seems a hard fate for any child to be born dedicate; and I cannot help suspecting that it may be the happiest thing for little Stella if she turns out, after all, to be completely commonplace.

Miss Platt had told me already of Hilda’s disappointment that the baby had not been a boy, and something in Hilda’s attitude as she reached and took her reminded me again that she had always thought and spoken of the coming child as a son. That was one thing that had not gone according to plan. Master of Arts as she was, and as much of a feminist as are most educated women nowadays, Hilda, like any Victorian, had attached her exceptional hopes to a young prince. Involuntarily, it flashed across my mind, as she took the child from Miss Platt, that perhaps a woman finds difficulty in seeing herself as Madonna towards an infant of her own sex. I was distressed and ashamed of the thought the next moment. And yet, the very fact that I could even hint to myself such a conjecture about Hilda —I suspect now that this was in truth the first painful step to my painful recovery.

I do not quite know how the suggestion reached me from Hilda’s manner at this moment. She handled the child gently, and looked at her quietly, as she lay in her arms, and smiled when I praised her. Perhaps, it was all a shade too quiet for an enthusiastic young mother; but then, after all, she was still obviously very weak. And it might have been merely in consideration for me that she changed the subject almost at once, and asked me about outside events, and listened while I gave her a flow of social gossip such as she had never shown much interest in of old, but now seemed to swallow with the avidity of isolation.

invisible mother

When tea was brought, she seized the opportunity to give the baby back to the nurse, and this time my impression was more definite.

“Here, take her, nurse. She’s getting too heavy for me.”

It was the first time that I had ever heard fretfulness in Hilda’s voice, and I felt that I wanted to turn away my eyes. But I went on talking as if I had noticed nothing unexpected, and she regained her equanimity immediately.

As I was leaving, I stopped to speak to Miss Platt in an outer room. What I had observed had puzzled and worried me, and I wanted, if possible, to gather a little more information. She and I had become good friends in the last weeks, and had discussed Hilda’s case together, though with reticence, since I did not know how far she was in Hilda’s confidence, or whether she understood what had been the truth behind her marriage to Michael Bristowe. I enquired casually now whether Hilda had the child with her very much.

***

Stay tuned!

RADIUM AGE SCIENCE FICTION: “Radium Age” is HiLobrow’s name for the 1904–33 era, which saw the discovery of radioactivity, the revelation that matter itself is constantly in movement — a fitting metaphor for the first decades of the 20th century, during which old scientific, religious, political, and social certainties were shattered. This era also saw the publication of genre-shattering writing by Edgar Rice Burroughs, Sax Rohmer, E.E. “Doc” Smith, Jack London, Arthur Conan Doyle, Aldous Huxley, Olaf Stapledon, Karel Čapek, H.P. Lovecraft, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Yevgeny Zamyatin, Philip Gordon Wylie, and other pioneers of post-Verne/Wells, pre-Golden Age “science fiction.” More info here.

READ GORGEOUS PAPERBACKS: HiLoBooks has reissued the following 10 obscure but amazing Radium Age science fiction novels in beautiful print editions: Jack London’s The Scarlet Plague, Rudyard Kipling’s With the Night Mail (and “As Easy as A.B.C.”), Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Poison Belt, H. Rider Haggard’s When the World Shook, Edward Shanks’ The People of the Ruins, William Hope Hodgson’s The Night Land, J.D. Beresford’s Goslings, E.V. Odle’s The Clockwork Man, Cicely Hamilton’s Theodore Savage, and Muriel Jaeger’s The Man with Six Senses. For more information, visit the HiLoBooks homepage.

READ HERE AT HILOBROW: Jack London’s The Scarlet Plague | Rudyard Kipling’s With the Night Mail (and “As Easy as A.B.C.”) | Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Poison Belt | H. Rider Haggard’s When the World Shook | Edward Shanks’ The People of the Ruins | William Hope Hodgson’s The Night Land | J.D. Beresford’s Goslings | E.V. Odle’s The Clockwork Man | Cicely Hamilton’s Theodore Savage | Muriel Jaeger’s The Man With Six Senses | Jack London’s “The Red One” | Philip Francis Nowlan’s Armageddon 2419 A.D. | Homer Eon Flint’s The Devolutionist | W.E.B. DuBois’s “The Comet” | Edgar Rice Burroughs’s “The Moon Men” | Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland | Sax Rohmer’s “The Zayat Kiss”

READ: HiLobrow’s previous serialized novels, both original works: James Parker’s The Ballad of Cocky The Fox (“a proof-of-concept that serialization can work on the Internet” — The Atlantic) and Karinne Keithley Syers’s Linda Linda Linda. We also publish original stories and comics.

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William Hope Hodgson

hodgson

“In all literature, there are few works so sheerly remarkable, so purely creative, as The Night Land,” enthused Clark Ashton Smith in 1944. “Only a great poet could have conceived and written this story.” The author to whom Smith refers is WILLIAM HOPE HODGSON (1877–1918), an English sailor, bodybuilder, photographer, and — yes — poet, who’d achieved modest renown (before he was killed at Ypres during WWI) as a pioneer of what is now called “weird” fantasy and science fiction. Carnacki, protagonist of many Hodgson stories, is one of literature’s first serialized occult detectives, forerunner of Kolchak and Hellboy; The House on the Borderland (1908) is supernatural fantasy with cosmic sci-fi moments; and China Miéville has suggested that the “weird tentacle” meme later popularized by H.P. Lovecraft begins with Hodgson’s 1907 novel The Boats of the “Glen-Carrig”. Hodgson’s (flawed) masterpiece is 1912’s The Night Land, a knightly quest set in the far future, when what remains of the human population dwells below the Earth’s frozen surface surrounded by “ab-humans,” enormous slugs and spiders, and malevolent Watching Things from an alien dimension. Brrr! Let us pray, along with Clark Ashton Smith, that “work of such unusual power will eventually win the attention and fame to which it is entitled.”

MORE RADIUM AGE SCI FI ON HILOBROW: HiLoBooks homepage! | What is Radium Age science fiction? | Radium Age Supermen | Radium Age Robots | Radium Age Apocalypses | Radium Age Telepaths | Radium Age Eco-Catastrophes | Radium Age Cover Art (1) | SF’s Best Year Ever: 1912 | Radium Age Science Fiction Poetry | Enter Highbrowism | Bathybius! Primordial ooze in Radium Age sf | War and Peace Games (H.G. Wells’s training manuals for supermen) | J.D. Beresford | Algernon Blackwood | Edgar Rice Burroughs | Karel Čapek | Buster Crabbe | August Derleth | Arthur Conan Doyle | Charlotte Perkins Gilman | Cicely Hamilton | Hermann Hesse | William Hope Hodgson | Aldous Huxley | Inez Haynes Irwin | Alfred Jarry | Jack Kirby (Radium Age sf’s influence on) | Murray Leinster | Gustave Le Rouge | Gaston Leroux | David Lindsay | Jack London | H.P. Lovecraft | A. Merritt | Maureen O’Sullivan | Sax Rohmer | Paul Scheerbart | Upton Sinclair | Clark Ashton Smith | E.E. “Doc” Smith | Olaf Stapledon | John Taine | H.G. Wells | Jack Williamson | Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz | S. Fowler Wright | Philip Gordon Wylie | Yevgeny Zamyatin

READ GORGEOUS PAPERBACKS: HiLoBooks has reissued the following 10 obscure but amazing Radium Age science fiction novels in beautiful print editions: Jack London’s The Scarlet Plague, Rudyard Kipling’s With the Night Mail (and “As Easy as A.B.C.”), Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Poison Belt, H. Rider Haggard’s When the World Shook, Edward Shanks’ The People of the Ruins, William Hope Hodgson’s The Night Land, J.D. Beresford’s Goslings, E.V. Odle’s The Clockwork Man, Cicely Hamilton’s Theodore Savage, and Muriel Jaeger’s The Man with Six Senses. For more information, visit the HiLoBooks homepage.

READ HERE AT HILOBROW: Jack London’s The Scarlet Plague | Rudyard Kipling’s With the Night Mail (and “As Easy as A.B.C.”) | Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Poison Belt | H. Rider Haggard’s When the World Shook | Edward Shanks’ The People of the Ruins | William Hope Hodgson’s The Night Land | J.D. Beresford’s Goslings | E.V. Odle’s The Clockwork Man | Cicely Hamilton’s Theodore Savage | Muriel Jaeger’s The Man With Six Senses | Jack London’s “The Red One” | Philip Francis Nowlan’s Armageddon 2419 A.D. | Homer Eon Flint’s The Devolutionist | W.E.B. DuBois’s “The Comet” | Edgar Rice Burroughs’s “The Moon Men” | Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland | Sax Rohmer’s “The Zayat Kiss”

***

On his or her birthday, HiLobrow irregularly pays tribute to one of our high-, low-, no-, or hilobrow heroes. Also born this date: J. G. Ballard, Ol’ Dirty Bastard, Luke Reinhart.

READ MORE about members of the Psychonaut Generation (1874–83).

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Scoop!

An interview with the CU alumni behind the "what-would-i-say" Facebook meme.
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Scoop!

An interview with the CU alumni behind the "what-would-i-say" Facebook meme.
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Scoop!

An interview with the CU alumni behind the "what-would-i-say" Facebook meme.
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Scoop!

An interview with the CU alumni behind the "what-would-i-say" Facebook meme.
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“The Night” by Michéle Bernstein (Translated by Clodagh Kinsella) Edited by Everyone Agrees





One can gather that this is memoir writing, since we think the main two characters are Guy Debord and the author of this book, Michéle Bernstein.  And the book plays with the concept of memoir and novel, but it does say 'novel' on the front cover, and I am going to go with that.  The book is very much like Bernstein's first book "All The King's Horses" except this is witty turned into a 'new novel' or Nouveau Roman.  Whatever it is a satire or a homage to that form I don't know, but either way it doesn't take away the enjoyment of going with the main couple's long walks through the Left Bank of Paris.  in fact I had to stop myself from google mapping the streets - which one can do, because their walks are deeply and specifically perfect.  There is another woman involved and in a way it is a story about seduction, power, and exploring.  I'm a Bernstein fan.

Also the production level of the publisher of this book, Book Works, is pretty great.   The book is translated by Clodagh Kinsella and edited by Everyone Else.  There is a sequel of sorts.... well review that next!
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The cold stream that feeds the pond

Nico on Tavener.
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The cold stream that feeds the pond

Nico on Tavener.
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The cold stream that feeds the pond

Nico on Tavener.
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The cold stream that feeds the pond

Nico on Tavener.
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The cold stream that feeds the pond

Nico on Tavener.
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“Highly sensitive personal and important business information will be stored in many of the…”

“Highly sensitive personal and important business information will be stored in many of the contemplated systems … At present, nothing more than trust—or, at best, a lack of technical sophistication—stands in the way of a would-be eavesdropper … Today we lack the mechanisms to insure adequate safeguards. Because of the difficulty in rebuilding complex systems to incorporate safeguards at a later date, it appears desirable to anticipate these problems.”

- Quoted from Paul Baran, “The Future Computer Utility”, 1967, in Evgeny Morozov on Why Our Privacy Problem is a Democracy Problem in Disguise | MIT Technology Review
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Fair! Google Books case dismissed.

original ferris wheel - from the Open Library

Karen Coyle has done an excellent write up of this so I will refer you there.

The full impact of this ruling is impossible (for me) to predict, but there are many among us who are breathing a great sigh of relief today. This opens the door for us to rethink digital scholarship based on materials produced before information was in digital form.

Folks can read the actual ruling (pdf) if they’d like. This is a very big deal. Thanks to folks who worked so hard on getting us to this place. I’ll add a few links here as they come in.

  • Kenneth Crews, Columbia Copyright Advisory Office: “This ruling joins court decisions about HathiTrust and electronic reserves in demonstrating that even extensive digitization can be within fair use where the social benefits are strong and the harm to rightsholders is constrained. There will be more to come as we transition into a new era of copyright, technology, and even reading.”
  • Brandon Butler, ARL Policy Notes blog; “The decision is a victory not only for transformative, non-consumptive search, but also for serving “traditionally underserved” libraries and their users, including disabled patrons.”
  • Paul Alan Levy: “This ruling provides a road map that allows any other entity to follow in Google’s path.”
  • Timothy Lee, Washington Post: “Many innovative media technologies involve aggregating or indexing copyrighted content. Today’s ruling is the clearest statement yet that such projects fall on the right side of the fair use line.”
  • Mike Masnick at Techdirt: “It all comes together in making a very strong argument that Google’s book scanning promotes the progress of the arts and sciences just like copyright is supposed to do.”
  • InfoDocket also has an updating list of links to discussion of the decision.
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How to Waste Time Productively: 17 Steps (with Pictures) by…



How to Waste Time Productively: 17 Steps (with Pictures) by Erica Scourti

Anyway, it’s not just freelancers who’ve been sucked into the social media value extraction machine, as Ian Bogost (a game designer AND philosopher, howz dat for multi-tasking) points out: ‘today, everyone’s a hustler…we’re not even just hustling for ourselves or our bosses, but for so many other, unseen bosses’. Instead of technology letting us chill the fuck out once in a while, we’re ‘hyperemployed’, as ‘we do tiny bits of work for Google, for Tumblr, for Twitter, all day and every day’ and guess what, you’re not getting paid for it.”

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DJ Run

DJ Run

Run-DMC carved out such a new space in hip hop — one that was quickly occupied by like-minded converts — that it can be difficult to assess the group’s merit non-anachronistically. Listening to DJ RUN’s (Joseph Ward Simmons, born 1964) wheezing, buzzing and raspberries in “Hit it Run” compares favorably only to the earliest efforts of modern, middle-school wannabe beatboxers. But beatboxing wasn’t Run’s forte, instead he was a natural storyteller, rhymes flowing with emotional and dynamic range only rarely evident in the delivery of his co-declaimer, DMC. Among the worthy innovations of early Run-DMC: consistent lyrical praise of their mostly silent but remarkable DJ, Jam Master Jay; call and response and elaborately interleaved vocals; hard-hitting lyrical delivery over spare beats; prominent inclusion of lead guitar riffs. Run embraced the blend of rap and rock, which led to some of their biggest hits, including “Rock Box,” “King of Rock,” and “Walk this Way,” boasting “our DJ’s better than all these bands.”

Run’s rapping holds up, though he has a tendency to reuse his darlings — Run’s world is filled with “Sucka MCs” and “funky fresh” rhymes. But his influence, as well as Run-DMC’s, is vast. In Licensed to Ill, Ad-Rock, MCA and Mike D are mostly doing DJ Run and Darryl Mac with more samples and less social conscience. From “Raising Hell” and “Rock Box” one can trace lines that go to such visionaries as Public Enemy and Rage Against the Machine. On the other hand, Run also bears some responsibility for Limp Bizkit and Korn. I think he would accept the blame; though Run thinks a lot of himself, he knows his limitations: “Like Martin Luther King, I will do my thing, I will say it in a rap, because I do not sing.”

***

HIP HOP ON HILOBROW: HERC YOUR ENTHUSIASM series (25 posts about old-school hip hop) | DJ Kool Herc as HiLo Hero | Gil Scott-Heron as HiLo Hero | Slick Rick as HiLo Hero | Darryl “D.M.C.” McDaniels as HiLo Hero | Afrika Bambaataa as HiLo Hero | Biz Markie as HiLo Hero | Eric B as HiLo Hero (forthcoming in November) | U-God as HiLo Hero | Slug as HiLo Hero | Adam Yauch as HiLo Hero | Ghostface Killah as HiLo Hero | DJ Run as HiLo Hero | Flavor Flav as HiLo Hero | Scott La Rock as HiLo Hero | GZA as HiLo Hero | Schoolly D as HiLo Hero | Aesop Rock as HiLo Hero | Notorious B.I.G. as HiLo Hero | Melle Mel as HiLo Hero | Rick Rubin as HiLo Hero | Rakim as HiLo Hero | Ol’ Dirty Bastard as HiLo Hero | Madlib as HiLo Hero | Talib Kweli as HiLo Hero | Danger Mouse as HiLo Hero | Kool Moe Dee as HiLo Hero | Chuck D as HiLo Hero | Dizzee Rascal as HiLo Hero | RZA as HiLo Hero | Cee-Lo Green as HiLo Hero | Best Ever Clean Hip Hop

On his or her birthday, HiLobrow irregularly pays tribute to one of our high-, low-, no-, or hilobrow heroes. Also born this date: Sacheen Littlefeather, Constance Rourke, Louise Brooks, William Steig.

READ MORE about men and women born on the cusp between the Original Generation X (1954–63) and Reconstructionist (1964–73) Generation.

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“The Conservative Party has attempted to erase a 10-year backlog of speeches from the internet,…”

The Conservative Party has attempted to erase a 10-year backlog of speeches from the internet, including pledges for a new kind of transparent politics the prime minister and chancellor made when they were campaigning for election.

Prime minister David Cameron and chancellor George Osborne campaigned on a promise to democratise information held by those in power, so people could hold them to account. They wanted to use the internet transform politics.

But the Conservative Party has removed the archive from its public facing website, erasing records of speeches and press releases going back to the year 2000 and up until it was elected in May 2010.

It also struck the record of their past speeches off internet engines including Google, which had been a role model for Cameron and Osborne’s “open source politics”.

And it erased the official record of their speeches from the Internet Archive, the public record of the net - with an effect as alarming as sending Men in Black to strip history books from a public library and burn them in the car park. […]

The Conservative bot blocker listed all the pages barred for public consumption thus (excerpt):

Disallow: /News/News_stories/2000/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2001/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2002/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2003/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2004/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2005/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2006/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2007/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2008/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2009/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/01/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/02/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/03/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/04/
Disallow: /News/News_stories/2010/05/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2000/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2001/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2002/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2003/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2004/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2005/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2006/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2007/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2008/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2009/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/01/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/02/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/03/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/04/
Disallow: /News/Speeches/2010/05/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2000/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2001/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2002/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2003/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2004/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2005/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2006/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2007/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2008/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2009/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/01/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/02/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/03/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/04/
Disallow: /News/Articles/2010/05/

For pages at these addresses, the Internet Archive reported: “Page cannot be crawled or displayed due to robots.txt”.



- Conservatives erase Internet history - Public Sector IT
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Hazlittiana

Short notice I'm afraid - have been too busy this week to deal with email and announcements properly, and am due some catch-up - but I am leading a workshop tomorrow at the CUNY Graduate Center on two of my favorite of Hazlitt's essays, 12-2pm. More information here.
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Hazlittiana

Short notice I'm afraid - have been too busy this week to deal with email and announcements properly, and am due some catch-up - but I am leading a workshop tomorrow at the CUNY Graduate Center on two of my favorite of Hazlitt's essays, 12-2pm. More information here.
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Hazlittiana

Short notice I'm afraid - have been too busy this week to deal with email and announcements properly, and am due some catch-up - but I am leading a workshop tomorrow at the CUNY Graduate Center on two of my favorite of Hazlitt's essays, 12-2pm. More information here.
Uncategorized

Hazlittiana

Short notice I'm afraid - have been too busy this week to deal with email and announcements properly, and am due some catch-up - but I am leading a workshop tomorrow at the CUNY Graduate Center on two of my favorite of Hazlitt's essays, 12-2pm. More information here.
Uncategorized

Hazlittiana

Short notice I'm afraid - have been too busy this week to deal with email and announcements properly, and am due some catch-up - but I am leading a workshop tomorrow at the CUNY Graduate Center on two of my favorite of Hazlitt's essays, 12-2pm. More information here.
Uncategorized

Hazlittiana

Short notice I'm afraid - have been too busy this week to deal with email and announcements properly, and am due some catch-up - but I am leading a workshop tomorrow at the CUNY Graduate Center on two of my favorite of Hazlitt's essays, 12-2pm. More information here.
Uncategorized

Hazlittiana

Short notice I'm afraid - have been too busy this week to deal with email and announcements properly, and am due some catch-up - but I am leading a workshop tomorrow at the CUNY Graduate Center on two of my favorite of Hazlitt's essays, 12-2pm. More information here.
Uncategorized

Hazlittiana

Short notice I'm afraid - have been too busy this week to deal with email and announcements properly, and am due some catch-up - but I am leading a workshop tomorrow at the CUNY Graduate Center on two of my favorite of Hazlitt's essays, 12-2pm. More information here.
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“The Army of Islam, an umbrella group that also opposes al-Qaeda’s Nusra Front in Syria, posted…”

The Army of Islam, an umbrella group that also opposes al-Qaeda’s Nusra Front in Syria, posted the advert on its Facebook page. “The media arm of the Army of Islam announces vacancies in the following fields: graphic design, photography, montage, printing, journalism, reporting, media promotion and programming, as well as other media specialisations,” it says, listing Skype and email addresses for applicants to send their CVs, along with a phone number.

Although the group was only set up at the end of September, it has already established a professional website featuring videos of the military exploits of its 50-plus brigades and battalions, and a Facebook page with more than 6,000 likes. The website has a “Most Liked Operations” section and an English language page. Other armed groups such as the Nusra Front and Free Syrian Army are also boosting their online propaganda presence, especially on YouTube and social media, but it seems the Army of Islam aims to steal a march in swelling its online ranks.



- BBC News - Syria: Graphic designers, the Army of Islam wants you, via Dan W.
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shebreathes: My muse. She’s stunning. #beauty #style #muse



shebreathes:

My muse. She’s stunning. #beauty #style #muse

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“We were spending anywhere from $10,000 to $35,000 a day on traffic. My conversations with [these ad…”

“We were spending anywhere from $10,000 to $35,000 a day on traffic. My conversations with [these ad networks] were similar: They would let me decide how much I was willing to pay for traffic, and when I told them $0.002 or below, they made it clear they had little control over the quality of traffic they would send at that price. Quality didn’t really matter to us, though. As a website running an arbitrage model, all that mattered was profit, and for every $0.002 visit we were buying, we were making between $0.0025 and $0.004 selling display ads through networks and exchanges”

- Inside Ad Tech Fraud: Confessions of a Fake Web Traffic Buyer | Digiday
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“No one knows how many schools are now using biometric technology like this because it seems that the…”

No one knows how many schools are now using biometric technology like this because it seems that the government is not keeping a record. Some estimates suggest that as many as 30% of all schools in the UK have fingerprinting technology. This means that millions of children are having their fingerprints taken and retained. This massive expansion of the collection of highly personal data has been allowed to take place without parliamentary scrutiny or public debate. […]

The main reasons given by schools for introducing biometric technologies are to assist in registration, library and canteen systems. Upon entry, the pupil is required to place his or her finger on a scanner whereupon the software will identify them as someone entitled to access the service. It is argued that access to the service is made faster and more efficient, but also that the system can keep tabs on the pupil (so that it is easier, for example, to spot if a student is skipping school). Using a cashless system like this is also credited with reducing bullying and stigmatisation, especially for those on free school meals. It has been suggested that parents can keep better track of what their kids are eating, with some sort of block being put on the canteen system if the child tries to buy unsuitable food.

Although fingerprinting technology is still the main biometric systems employed by schools, other trials to date have included retinal scanning and palm-vein scanning.

So what is wrong with this? Certainly when I asked my 14-year-old and some of his friends about it, they didn’t immediately see anything wrong with fingerprints and scanners in schools – in fact, they quite liked the futuristic style of the technology as opposed to their battered old library cards, or boring registration procedures. Liberty does not share their enthusiasm. Indeed one of our principal concerns is that it plays on these ideas and gets children accustomed to giving up their highly personal biometric data as a matter of routine.

If children at primary school age are taught that it is normal to hand fingerprints or other personal data to their school or local authority, how alarmed are they going to be if and when, as adults, a future government tries to reintroduce the idea of ID cards, for example, or to argue that there should be universal DNA retention?



- Can I refuse to have my child fingerprinted at school? | Emma Norton | Comment is free | theguardian.com
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Photo



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65 Fantasy Adventures

Image from John Hilgart's 4CP archive

Image from John Hilgart’s 4CP archive

Recently, I compiled a list of two hundred of my favorite adventures published before the Eighties (1984–93).

Twenty-three of the titles on that list are fantasy adventures. Also, via the following posts — Best 19th Century Adventure (1805–1903) | Best Nineteen-Oughts Adventure (1904–13) | Best Nineteen-Teens Adventure (1914–23) | Best Twenties Adventure (1924–33) | Best Thirties Adventure (1934–43) | Best Forties Adventure (1944–53) | Best Fifties Adventure (1954–63) | Best Sixties Adventure (1964–73) | Best Seventies Adventure (1974–83) — I listed another two hundred and fifty of my favorite adventures. Forty-two of the titles on those secondary lists are fantasy.

Thus — below, please find a list of sixty-five of my favorite fantasy adventures — arranged not qualitatively (which would be impossible) but chronologically. The titles marked with an asterisk (*) are from my Top 200 Adventures list; the others are second-tier favorites.

TOP 450 ADVENTURES — BY SUBGENRE: 101 Science Fiction | 70 Crime | 65 Fantasy | 60 Espionage | 40 Atavistic & Historical | 25 Frontier & Western | 20 Avenger & Artful Dodger | 20 Apophenic & Treasure Hunt | 20 War & Ruritanian | 18 Picaresque | 11 Robinsonade & Survival |

A couple of quick notes: Why no H.P. Lovecraft? Because I’ve classified him as an sf author. Why is there a Tarzan novel here, when most of the Tarzan books are classified (by me) as atavistic adventures? Because in this one he shrinks to the size of an ant! Pippi Longstocking? Inhuman strength. Aren’t Lost Horizon and Tintin in Tibet exploration adventures? Yes, but: the secret of longevity in the former, levitating monk and hairy cryptid in the latter.

tolkien

MORE LIT LISTS FROM THIS AUTHOR: Index to All Adventure Lists | Best 19th Century Adventure (1805–1903) | Best Nineteen-Oughts Adventure (1904–13) | Best Nineteen-Teens Adventure (1914–23) | Best Twenties Adventure (1924–33) | Best Thirties Adventure (1934–43) | Best Forties Adventure (1944–53) | Best Fifties Adventure (1954–63) | Best Sixties Adventure (1964–73) | Best Seventies Adventure (1974–83). ALSO: Best YA Fiction of 1963 | Best Scottish Fabulists | Radium-Age Telepath Lit | Radium Age Superman Lit | Radium Age Robot Lit | Radium Age Apocalypse Lit | Radium Age Eco-Catastrophe Lit | Radium Age Cover Art (1) | SF’s Best Year Ever: 1912 | Cold War “X” Fic | Best YA Sci-Fi | Hooker Lit | No-Fault Eco-Catastrophe Lit | Scrabble Lit |

*

Why does my Top Adventures List project stop in 1983? Because: I’m far more widely read in pre-1983 adventure; I have friends who’ve published adventures since 1983, and I don’t want guilt to be a factor in my list-making. Plus, adventure fans already know which post-1983 books are great, right?

In chronological order, here is the list of my Top 65 Fantasy Adventures.

    THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

    feval_chevalier_tenebre

  1. 1860. Paul Féval’s vampire adventure Knightshade (French: Le Chevalier Ténèbre).
  2. * 1865. Lewis Carroll’s fantasy adventure Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.
  3. looking1

  4. 1871. Lewis Carroll’s fantasy adventure Through the Looking-Glass. Enter the Jabberwocky!
  5. 1889. William Morris’s fantasy adventure The House of the Wolfings. An important influence on J.R.R. Tolkien.
  6. 1889. William Morris’s fantasy adventure The Story of the Glittering Plain.
  7. dracula

  8. * 1897. Bram Stoker’s supernatural horror adventure Dracula, whose readers know what kind of monster the protagonists seek before they do. Described by Neil Gaiman as a “Victorian high-tech thriller,” the book’s use of cutting-edge technology — and true-crime story telling, from newspaper clippings to phonograph-recorded notes — creates an eerily realistic vibe.
  9. 1900. L. Frank Baum’s fantasy adventure The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.
  10. THE NINETEEN-OUGHTS (1904–13)

  11. 1904. J.M. Barrie’s play Peter Pan. Turned into the 1911 novel Peter and Wendy.
  12. OzMarvelous_1024x1024

  13. 1904. L. Frank Baum’s The Marvelous Land of Oz, sequel to The Wizard of Oz. A boy named Tip makes a man out of wood and gives him a pumpkin for a head. A witch brings this creation to life, and one of my favorite Oz adventures begins.
  14. 1906. Edith Nesbit’s YA novel The Story of the Amulet deserves a mention here.
  15. * 1907. L. Frank Baum’s Oz fantasy adventure Ozma of Oz. My favorite Oz book — in which Dorothy Gale and a talking hen (Billina) wash up in the Land of Ev, where they encounter proto-steampunk Wheelers, the wicked Nome King, and Baum’s greatest character, Tik-Tok the mechanical man.
  16. wind-willows_grahame

  17. * 1908. Kenneth Grahame’s children’s book The Wind in the Willows. Not an adventure in every particular, but Toad’s wild ride and prison break are amazing, as is the battle to reclaim Toad Hall from the weasels, stoats, and ferrets who’ve invaded from the Wild Wood.
  18. 1908. William Hope Hodgson’s supernatural adventure The House on the Borderland. The titular house is built over a pit… that is in some way connected with the universe… and from which swine-things come and go in the night. The narrator has a cosmic vision of Eternity.
  19. stoker worm

  20. 1911. Bram Stoker’s horror thriller The Lair of the White Worm.
  21. THE TEENS (1914–23)

  22. 1914. L. Frank Baum’s fantasy adventure Tik-Tok of Oz is a personal favorite.
  23. merritt moon

  24. 1918/1919. A. Merritt’s fantasy adventure The Moon Pool.
  25. 1918. Sax Rohmer’s supernatural adventure Brood of the Witch Queen. Considered one of the author’s best novels.
  26. cabell jurgen

  27. * 1919. James Branch Cabell’s comical fantasy adventure Jurgen, A Comedy of Justice. In search of courtly love, the protagonist — a poet, who is allowed to relive a year of his youth — journeys through fantastic realms. The novel’s sexual content caused a storm of controversy. Aleister Crowley was a fan, and Robert Heinlein patterned Stranger in a Strange Land after it.
  28. 1920. Hugh Lofting’s children’s adventure The Story of Doctor Dolittle deserves a mention here.
  29. eddison

  30. 1922. E.R. Eddison’s fantasy adventure The Worm Ouroboros.
  31. THE TWENTIES (1924–33)

  32. 1924. Edgar Rice Burroughs’s Tarzan and the Ant Men. Serialized and also published in book form the same year. NB: This book is mentioned in To Kill A Mockingbird.
  33. merritt ishtar

  34. 1924. A. Merritt’s fantasy adventure The Ship of Ishtar.
  35. 1927. John Buchan’s historical/supernatural adventure Witch Wood. A new minister arrives in a tiny Scottish town, at some point in the 17th Century. Evil lurks there.
  36. 1930. Charles Williams’s fantasy adventure War in Heaven. Williams was one of the Inklings, the Oxford dons whose number included J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis. Murder mystery meets Arthurian romance; a predecessor to Susan Cooper’s YA Dark is Rising series.
  37. west balso snell

  38. 1931. Nathanael West’s The Dream Life of Balso Snell. A surrealistic fantasy. The author’s blurb announced the book’s “use of the violently dissociated, the dehumanized marvelous, the deliberately criminal and imbecilic.”
  39. james hilton horizon 1952

  40. * 1933. James Hilton’s adventure Lost Horizon. A kidnapped Englishman who is temperamentally — thanks to his WWI experience — a philosophical ironist (but not a cynic!) discovers, in a remote Tibetan valley, a quasi-monastic community for whom philosophical irony has been elevated to a noble Weltanschauung.
  41. * 1933. Guy Endore’s horror/historical adventure The Werewolf of Paris. In a city besieged by the Prussian Army, a young man — who might or might not be a werewolf — begins to feed upon the blood of his willing, perverted lover.
  42. THE THIRTIES (1934–43)

    C L MooreJirel of Joiry Paperback Library069

  43. 1934–39. C.L. Moore’s occult/fantasy adventure Jirel of Joiry. Five stories, about a female adventurer.
  44. 1935. E.R. Eddison’s fantasy adventure Mistress of Mistresses, the first in the Zimiamvian trilogy. These works of high fantasy were highly praised by J.R.R. Tolkien, C.S. Lewis, and Ursula K. LeGuin.
  45. leiber adept

  46. 1936. Fritz Leiber’s first Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser novella, Adept’s Gambit written… but not published until 1947.
  47. * 1937. J.R.R. Tolkien’s fantasy adventure The Hobbit, in which stay-at-home halfling Bilbo Baggins is persuaded by the wizard Gandalf to travel across Middle Earth and burgle the dragon Smaug’s treasure hoard. Along the way he and his dwarven companions encounter elves and trolls, goblins and wargs, talking spiders, and the twisted creature Gollum.
  48. white-th-sword

  49. * 1938. T.H. White’s fantasy adventure The Sword in the Stone. It may have been adapted into a Disney movie, but it’s not for kids. Merlin is weird and wise; Maid Marian is a leather-clad bad-ass; Colonel Cully (a hawk) is insane; King Pellinore is a bumbling fellow who can’t give up his search for the “Questin’ Beast.” From these and other marvelous characters, the Wart learns to be a great king.
  50. 1940. Jack Williamson’s occult adventure Darker Than You Think, a werewolves vs. humans battle.
  51. 1940. L. Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt’s atavastic fantasy adventure The Roaring Trumpet and The Mathematics of Magic. Reissued, with 1941′s The Castle of Iron, in 1975 as The Compleat Enchanter.
  52. pratt unreason

  53. * 1941. Fletcher Pratt and L. Sprague de Camp’s fantasy adventure Land of Unreason. An American diplomat is wounded during a WWII air raid in England; while recuperating in Yorkshire, he is transported to the land of Faerie. There, he is recruited by Titania and Oberon, who send him on a secret mission to the totalitarian Kobold Hills (i.e., Germany).
  54. 1943. Fritz Leiber’s fantasy adventure Conjure Wife, in which a professor who studies primitive rituals and superstitions is targeted by the jealous wife of a colleague — she’s a witch. Luckily for him, so is his wife! In the end, the professor must apply scientific methodology to witchcraft. Adapted as the excellent 1961 horror movie Burn, Witch, Burn.
  55. THE FORTIES (1944–53)

    Pippi_Långstrump

  56. 1944. Astrid Lindgren’s YA adventure Pippi Longstocking.
  57. * 1945. E.B. White’s children’s fantasy adventure Stuart Little. A mouse born to a human family races a sailboat in Central Park, gets shipped out to sea in a garbage can, and sets out — several years before Kerouac’s On the Road — on a cross-country odyssey. The book was criticized, at the time, by the New York Public Library’s influential children’s lit expert for being nonaffirmative, inconclusive, and unfit for kids.
  58. kuttner dark

  59. 1946. Henry Kuttner’s (or C.L. Moore’s?) fantasy adventure The Dark World, in which a wartime flyer is drawn into an alternate-reality Earth… and replaced by the ruthless Ganelon, a member of the Dark World’s ruling coven. Published in book form in 1965.
  60. 1946. Mervyn Peake’s fantasy adventure Titus Groan, first of the Gormenghast series. Peake was a well-known illustrator; his writing is wildly descriptive.
  61. Print

  62. 1946–50. Maurice Richardson’s fantasy adventure story collection The Exploits of Engelbrecht, about a Dwarf Surrealist boxer’s bouts across time and space. Published in the British magazine Lilliput, the stories were collected as a book in 1950.
  63. * 1937–49. J.R.R. Tolkien’s fantasy adventure The Lord of the Rings was written during these years. A posse of easy-going hobbits must destroy the One Ring, the ultimate weapon created by the Dark Lord. They are aided by the superhuman ranger Aragorn, the Human Boromir, the Dwarf Gimli, the Elf Legolas, and the wizard Gandalf. The book began as a sequel to The Hobbit, then turned into an epic. Published as a book in 1954–55.
  64. caspian

  65. 1951. C.S. Lewis’s Narnia fantasy adventure Prince Caspian.
  66. 1952. C.S. Lewis’s Narnia fantasy adventure The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.
  67. anderson hearts

  68. 1953. Poul Anderson’s fantasy adventure Three Hearts and Three Lions, serialized. Holger Carlsen is an Allied covert operative who winds up in a parallel universe, one whose historical past is the Matter of France. There, he must prevent the evil of Faerie from encroaching on humanity. Expanded and published in 1961. NB: The Dungeons & Dragons alignment system was influenced by this book.
  69. THE FIFTIES (1954–63)

    anderson broken

  70. * 1954. Poul Anderson’s fantasy adventure The Broken Sword. Michael Moorcock declared The Broken Sword superior to Tolkien, calling it “a fast-paced doom-drenched tragedy in which human heroism, love and ambition, manipulated by amoral gods, elves and trolls, led inevitably to tragic consequences.” PS: It was influenced by H. Rider Haggard’s 1891 Viking adventure The Saga of Eric Brighteyes.
  71. * 1955. Crockett Johnson’s children’s dream adventure Harold and the Purple Crayon. A four-year-old with a purple crayon draws an adventure for himself. Along with Ruth Krauss, P.D. Eastman, Syd Hoff, Leo Lionni, Lilian Moore, and William Steig, Johnson (who was author, from 1942–52, of the great newspaper strip Barnaby) was a leftist who raised questions — in an ostensibly playful manner — about our taken-for-granted forms and norms.
  72. tintin tibet

  73. * 1958–59. Hergé’s Tintin adventure Tintin in Tibet, the author’s own favorite of his books. A strange adventure without an antagonist (unless the Yeti counts?), without Calculus or the Thompsons. Just Tintin, Haddock, Snowy, and the sherpa Tharkey, trekking across the Himalayan mountains in search of the sole survivor of a plane crash. An emotional, mystical, funny, weird voyage of redemption. Published as a color album in 1960.
  74. * 1963. Maurice Sendak’s children’s fantasy adventure Where the Wild Things Are. Forget the self-consciously sad live-action 2009 Spike Jonze/Dave Eggers feature-film adaptation — please! Dressed in a wolf costume, Max goes wild — and is sent to his room, which transforms into a jungle. Max sails to an island inhabited by magnificently grotesque Wild Things, whom he (the most feral thing on the island) subjugates. A Wild Rumpus ensues.
  75. heinlein glory

  76. 1963. Robert A. Heinlein’s fantasy adventure Glory Road.
  77. 1963. Michael Moorcock’s Elric fantasy adventure The Stealer of Souls.
  78. THE SIXTIES (1964–73)

    books-dahl

  79. 1964. Roald Dahl’s children’s fantasy adventure Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.
  80. 1968. Ursula K. Le Guin’s Earthsea fantasy adventure A Wizard of Earthsea.
  81. blish easter

  82. 1968. James Blish’s fantasy adventure Black Easter. An arms dealer hires a black magician to unleash all the demons of Hell on Earth for a single day.
  83. 1969. Kingsley Amis’s fantasy adventure The Green Man.
  84. adams watership

  85. * 1972. Richard Adams’s epic talking-animal adventure Watership Down, sometimes called the rabbits’ Aeneid. A group of rabbits escape the destruction of their warren and journey across south-central England in search of a new home. Along the way, they encounter predators, snares, and automobiles; and they’re tempted to join un-free rabbit societies; the monstrous rabbit leader of one of these societies leads an attack on their new warren. Fortunately, the nomadic rabbits are resourceful and brave… and they’ve learned how to survive and thrive from the lapine mythology of El-ahrairah the trickster.
  86. 1972. Angela Carter’s fantasy adventure The Infernal Desire Machines of Dr Hoffman.
  87. hrolf

  88. 1973. Poul Anderson’s fantasy/atavistic adventure Hrolf Kraki’s Saga, retelling the story of a legendary 6th-century Danish king from such sources as Iceland’s Hrólfs saga kraka.
  89. 1973. Susan Cooper’s Dark is Rising YA fantasy adventure The Dark is Rising. The second in a series of five.
  90. 1973. Alan Garner’s fantasy adventure Red Shift. The author of some of my favorite YA fantasy here portrays a present-day England overlaid by a disintegrating Vietnam-like Roman Britain. A darker version of what Susan Cooper was doing at the same time.
  91. The Princess Bride Ballantine Edition

  92. 1973. William Goldman’s fantasy adventure The Princess Bride. An ironic homage to the genre.
  93. THE SEVENTIES (1974–83)

  94. 1980. Geoffrey Household’s occult adventure The Sending. When Hollaston, an ex-Indian Army colonel, inherits a dead friend’s polecat, he discovers that he has suppressed shamanistic powers… and what’s more, he’s being targeted — via psychic transmissions — by a cult! Four decades after Rogue Male, another great yarn from the great Household.
  95. lanark514

  96. 1981. Alasdair Gray’s postmodernist fantasy adventure Lanark. In two of this epic tome’s four sections, a young Glaswegian is driven mad by his inability to form relationships; in the other two sections, Unthank — a Glasgow-like fantasy civilization — disintegrates for the same reason. Are the two narratives connected? Perhaps, perhaps not. In the Epilogue, the author himself tells the protagonist: “A heavy book will make a bigger splash than two light ones.”
  97. 1981. John Crowley’s fantasy adventure Little, Big. The complex, sprawling, quasi-mythic story of an eccentric family’s relationship with the occluded world of faerie. The family’s members believe that they are each part of a grand supernatural Tale, and that their fates are intertwined with the faeries’ hidden universe. According to Harold Bloom: “A neglected masterpiece. The closest achievement we have to the Alice stories of Lewis Carroll.”
  98. pratchett colour

  99. 1983. Terry Pratchett’s comical fantasy adventure The Colour of Magic, the first book of the Discworld series. Caught up in a boardgame played by the gods of Discworld, the incompetent wizard Rincewind journeys across the Disc with wealthy tourist Twoflower. A sardonic inversion of fantasy; Pratchett has described the book as “an attempt to do for the classical fantasy universe what Blazing Saddles did for Westerns.”

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TOP 450 ADVENTURES — BY SUBGENRE: 101 Science Fiction | 70 Crime | 65 Fantasy | 60 Espionage | 40 Atavistic & Historical | 25 Frontier & Western | 20 Avenger & Artful Dodger | 20 Apophenic & Treasure Hunt | 20 War & Ruritanian | 18 Picaresque | 11 Robinsonade & Survival |

20 ADVENTURE THEMES AND MEMES: Index to All Adventure Lists | Introduction to Adventure Themes & Memes Series | Index to Entire Series | The Robinsonade (theme: DIY) | The Robinsonade (theme: Un-Alienated Work) | The Robinsonade (theme: Cozy Catastrophe) | The Argonautica (theme: All for One, One for All) | The Argonautica (theme: Crackerjacks) | The Argonautica (theme: Argonaut Folly) | The Argonautica (theme: Beautiful Losers) | The Treasure Hunt | The Frontier Epic | The Picaresque | The Avenger Drama (theme: Secret Identity) | The Avenger Drama (theme: Self-Liberation) | The Avenger Drama (theme: Reluctant Bad-Ass) | The Atavistic Epic | The Hide-And-Go-Seek Game (theme: Artful Dodger) | The Hide-And-Go-Seek Game (theme: Conspiracy Theory) | The Hide-And-Go-Seek Game (theme: Apophenia) | The Survival Epic | The Ruritanian Fantasy | The Escapade

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70 Crime Adventures

Image from John Hilgart's 4CP archive

Image from John Hilgart’s 4CP archive

Recently, I compiled a list of two hundred of my favorite adventures published before the Eighties (1984–93).

Twenty-seven of the titles on that list are crime adventures. Also, via the following posts — Best 19th Century Adventure (1805–1903) | Best Nineteen-Oughts Adventure (1904–13) | Best Nineteen-Teens Adventure (1914–23) | Best Twenties Adventure (1924–33) | Best Thirties Adventure (1934–43) | Best Forties Adventure (1944–53) | Best Fifties Adventure (1954–63) | Best Sixties Adventure (1964–73) | Best Seventies Adventure (1974–83) — I listed another two hundred and fifty of my favorite adventures. Forty-three of the titles on those secondary lists are crime stories.

Thus — below, please find a list of seventy of my favorite crime adventures — arranged not qualitatively (which would be impossible) but chronologically. The titles marked with an asterisk (*) are from my Top 200 Adventures list; the others are second-tier favorites.

TOP 450 ADVENTURES — BY SUBGENRE: 101 Science Fiction | 70 Crime | 65 Fantasy | 60 Espionage | 40 Atavistic & Historical | 25 Frontier & Western | 20 Avenger & Artful Dodger | 20 Apophenic & Treasure Hunt | 20 War & Ruritanian | 18 Picaresque | 11 Robinsonade & Survival |

tiger charteris saint

MORE LIT LISTS FROM THIS AUTHOR: Index to All Adventure Lists | Best 19th Century Adventure (1805–1903) | Best Nineteen-Oughts Adventure (1904–13) | Best Nineteen-Teens Adventure (1914–23) | Best Twenties Adventure (1924–33) | Best Thirties Adventure (1934–43) | Best Forties Adventure (1944–53) | Best Fifties Adventure (1954–63) | Best Sixties Adventure (1964–73) | Best Seventies Adventure (1974–83). ALSO: Best YA Fiction of 1963 | Best Scottish Fabulists | Radium-Age Telepath Lit | Radium Age Superman Lit | Radium Age Robot Lit | Radium Age Apocalypse Lit | Radium Age Eco-Catastrophe Lit | Radium Age Cover Art (1) | SF’s Best Year Ever: 1912 | Cold War “X” Fic | Best YA Sci-Fi | Hooker Lit | No-Fault Eco-Catastrophe Lit | Scrabble Lit |

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In chronological order, here is the list of my Top 70 Crime Adventures.

    THE NINETEENTH CENTURY

    lecoq

  1. 1868. Émile Gaboriau’s crime adventure Monsieur Lecoq. The first case of the titular policeman (an ex-criminal), who’d made sporadic appearances in earlier works by the author, and who was to prove a major influence on Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes.
  2. * 1868. Wilkie Collins’s detective adventure The Moonstone. Generally considered the first English-language detective novel.
  3. sawyer twain

  4. 1876. Mark Twain’s Tom Sawyer, which — like Huckleberry Finn — is simultaneously a sardonic inversion of Scott-type romantic adventures, and itself an exciting adventure. The Injun Joe scene in the cave… brrr!
  5. 1894. S.R. Crockett’s The Raiders. Caught up in the strife between smugglers on the Solway Coast and the gypsies of Galloway, young Patrick Heron is flung into a society of outcasts and outlaws.
  6. doyle hound

  7. * 1901. Arthur Conan Doyle’s detective mystery adventure The Hound of the Baskervilles. Mystery adventures don’t have a large place on these lists of mine… because although they’re fun exercises in ratiocination and puzzle-solving, they’re often not particularly thrilling. Conan Doyle, however, is a great adventure writer. And this novel is not your typical Sherlock Holmes story; it is jam-packed with thrills and chills.
  8. THE NINETEEN-OUGHTS (1904–13)

  9. 1906. Edgar Wallace’s crime adventure The Four Just Men. Wallace was one of the two writing prodigies of the era — the other being Edgar Rice Burroughs. He wrote 167 novels in 14 years, and co-wrote the screenplay for King Kong.
  10. leblanc

  11. 1907. Maurice Leblanc’s crime adventure collection Arsène Lupin, Gentleman Burglar.
  12. 1909. Maurice Leblanc’s crime adventure The Hollow Needle, starring his gentleman thief character Arsène Lupin.
  13. fantomas

  14. * 1911. Marcel Allain and Pierre Souvestre’s crime adventure Fantômas, concerning the adventures of a sadistic sociopath — the original charismatic serial killer. Inspired a generation of French highbrow litterateurs to incorporate adventure themes into their work.
  15. * 1913. Earl Derr Biggers’s crime adventure Seven Keys to Baldpate. The best-known work by the author of the 1920s Charlie Chan adventures. A group of strangers meet at a mountaintop inn… and trouble follows.
  16. bentley trent

  17. 1913. E.C. Bentley’s crime adventure Trent’s Last Case.
  18. 1913. Marie Belloc Lowndes’s psychological thriller The Lodger. Is the lodger whose rent keeps Ellen and Robert Bunting’s family from the poorhouse actually a Jack the Ripper-esque serial killer?
  19. THE TEENS (1914–23)

    kafka trial

  20. 1914/1925. Franz Kafka’s The Trial. Sardonic inversion of an adventure.
  21. * 1914. Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes adventure The Valley of Fear. I try to avoid mysteries on these lists, because in most cases they’re not adventures, but the fourth and final Sherlock Holmes novel fits the bill. A coded message, Professor Moriarty, and a backstory based on the supposedly real-life exploits of the Molly Maguires in Pennsylvania!
  22. rohmer claw

  23. 1915. Sax Rohmer’s The Yellow Claw, in which Parisian criminal investigator Gaston Max battles master criminal Mister King.
  24. THE TWENTIES (1924–33)

    beau-geste-book

  25. 1924. P.C. Wren’s French Foreign Legion adventure Beau Geste, in which three brothers, each of whom is convinced that he is saving the other two from prison (a precious jewel has gone missing) by doing so — flee Britain and join the Foreign Legion. In French North Africa, a sadistic officer attempts to discover which of them (if any) possesses the jewel; meanwhile, bloodthirsty Tuaregs besiege their little garrison at Fort Zinderneuf.
  26. * 1925. Earl Derr Biggers’s Charlie Chan mystery/detective adventure The House Without a Key. The first in a series of six novels. The character of Charlie Chan was in part designed to counteract the British adventure’s tradition of the sinister, untrustworthy Oriental.
  27. hammett harvest

  28. 1927–28. Dashiell Hammett’s hardboiled crime adventure Red Harvest, featuring an unnamed detective: the “Continental Op.” Hammett based the story on his own experiences in Butte, Montana as an operative of the Pinkerton Detective Agency. Published as a book in 1929.
  29. * 1928. Leslie Charteris’s light-hearted mystery/crime adventure Meet the Tiger. Here, for the first time, we meet the wealthy adventurer Simon Templar (known as The Saint), his manservant ’Orace, and young socialite Patricia Holm. Templar, a thief who steals from thieves, aims to settle an old score with a mysterious individual known as “The Tiger.”
  30. kastner emil

  31. * 1929. Erich Kästner’s YA adventure Emil and the Detectives. En route to Berlin from the provinces, schoolboy Emil Tischbein is robbed of his mother’s salary, which he was bringing to his grandmother. Emil’s cousin, a tomboy named Pony, helps him gather a posse of Berlin street urchins; together they set a trap for the thief.
  32. 1929. W.R. Burnett’s crime adventure Little Caesar. An unprecedented insider’s look at Chicago gangsters. Made into a 1931 film starring Edward G. Robinson as the gangster Rico.
  33. 1929. P.G. Wodehouse’s comical Blandings Castle novel Summer Lightning is a spoof of crime adventures.
  34. maltese

  35. * 1930. Dashiell Hammett’s hardboiled crime/treasure-hunt adventure The Maltese Falcon. Grittily realistic, morally ambiguous; considered by aficionados to be the standard by which all subsequent American mysteries must be judged. The only novel featuring the character Sam Spade.
  36. * 1931–32. Hergé’s bande dessinée adventure Tintin in America serialized. Sent to Chicago, young reporter-adventurer Tintin and his dog Snowy tackle Al Capone’s mob, pursue another gangster across the country, encounter a tribe of Blackfoot Indians (who get exploited), and also evade a lynch mob and a wildfire! Published as a color album in 1945.
  37. tintin cigars

  38. * 1932–34. Hergé’s bande dessinée Tintin adventure Cigars of the Pharaoh serialized. In Egypt, Tintin and Snowy discover a tomb crowded with mummified Egyptologists and stashes of opium-filled cigars. They then pursue the Kih-Oskh drug smuggling cartel, whose members wear hoods and robes adorned with a sinister symbol — across the Arabian Peninsula and through India. Published as a color album in 1955.
  39. THE THIRTIES (1934–43)

    cain postman

  40. * 1934. James M. Cain’s hardboiled crime adventure The Postman Always Rings Twice, in which a drifter conspires with his lover to kill her husband, the owner of a roadside sandwich stand. The author’s first and most enduring book.
  41. * 1934–46. Milton Caniff’s hardboiled adventure comic Terry and the Pirates. Terry and his tutor, Pat Ryan, arrive in China seeking a lost gold mine. Accompanied by their interpreter Connie, the two get into one scrape — complicated by a beautiful woman, including spoiled Normandie Drake, the thief Burma, and the bandit queen Dragon Lady — after another.
  42. cheyney

  43. 1936. Peter Cheyney’s Lemmy Caution adventure This Man is Dangerous. Note that the first 9 of the 10 Lemmy Caution novels — which were far more popular in France than England — appear during the 1934–43 era.
  44. * 1937–38. Hergé’s Tintin adventure The Black Island. One more adventure romance set in Scotland! I’ve long suspected that The Black Island — in which Tintin escapes from an evil German doctor who runs a mental institution, then busts up a forgery racket in an abandoned castle on an island off the coast of Kiltoch (Scotland), is an homage to Buchan. Published as a color album in 1943.
  45. raymond-chandler-the-big-sleep410

  46. * 1939. Raymond Chandler’s hardboiled crime adventure The Big Sleep, in which we first meet wisecracking PI Philip Marlowe. This complex, amusing, thrilling story — whose characters double-cross one another at every turn — is one of the best novels of the century. Plus, Howard Hawks’s 1946 adaptation is terrific.
  47. 1940. Richard Wright’s Native Son. Bigger Thomas’s murder of a white woman is depicted as an act of liberation in dehumanized, segregated Chicago.
  48. farewell my lovely cover

  49. 1940. Raymond Chandler’s hardboiled crime adventure Farewell, My Lovely. Cynical PI Philip Marlowe returns, in a book considered by critics — and the author himself — as Chandler’s best.
  50. 1943. James M. Cain’s crime adventure Double Indemnity. An insurance agent is seduced by a woman into killing her husband. Adapted as the classic 1944 Billy Wilder film.
  51. THE FORTIES (1944–53)

    woolrich

  52. 1944. Cornell Woolrich’s's noir crime adventure The Black Path of Fear.
  53. 1945. Christianna Brand’s crime adventure Green for Danger.
  54. vian

  55. * 1946. Boris Vian’s (as Vernon Sullivan) noir crime adventure I Shall Spit on Your Graves. Lee Anderson, a light-skinned black man, sleeps with the daughters of a plantation owner who’d orchestrated the lynching of Anderson’s brother, thus setting the scene for an orgy of violence. It’s been described as “a fusion of prime US pulp and French sado-eroticism.” Recently reissued!
  56. * 1946. Kenneth Fearing’s noir crime adventure The Big Clock. George Stroud, a disaffected wage slave, must solve a murder… in which he is the chief suspect. Meanwhile, his boss, who’s assigned him the task, wants to pin the murder on him. Stroud is trapped in an invisible prison — the “Big Clock” of the title is short-hand for bureacracy.
  57. gresham nightmare

  58. 1946. William Lindsay Gresham’s crime adventure Nightmare Alley. Adapted into the excellent 1947 film noir of the same title. PS: Gresham’s wife, Joy Davidman, left him for C.S. Lewis.
  59. 1947. Mickey Spillane’s crime adventure I, the Jury.
  60. innes maddons 1956

  61. 1948. Hammond Innes’s sea-going/jailbreak adventure Maddon’s Rock. The dedication, to his wife, reads: “You have fed me Treasure Island for years as the most exciting adventure story ever written. Well, this isn’t Treasure Island. But there is an island. And there is bullion. And it is an exciting adventure story.”
  62. 1948. Boris Vian’s crime adventure To Hell with the Ugly.
  63. 1948–50. Hergé’s Tintin adventure Land of Black Gold. Color album published in 1950.
  64. canning salamander

  65. 1949. Victor Canning’s crime/hunted-man adventure The Golden Salamander. An archaeologist journeys to a tiny African port, where he stumbles upon a sinister secret. Culminating in a pretty excellent chase.
  66. 1949. W.R. Burnett’s heist adventure The Asphalt Jungle — made into the 1950 John Huston-directed movie.
  67. greene

  68. * 1950. Graham Greene’s crime adventure The Third Man, a treatment prepared by the author as he was writing the screenplay for the suspenseful 1949 movie of the same title. In postwar Vienna, Rollo Martins, a British author of pulp Westerns, discovers that his old friend Harry Lime is dead… and that he’d been suspected of being “the worst racketeer who ever made a dirty living in this city.” Martins begins an investigation to clear his friend’s name.
  69. * 1950. Patricia Highsmith’s crime adventure Strangers on a Train. Guy Haines wants to divorce his unfaithful wife, Miriam; while on a train, he meets Charles Anthony Bruno, a sociopath who proposes an idea to “exchange murders” — it seems his wants his father killed. Guy doesn’t take Bruno seriously… but when he returns from a trip to Mexico, he discovers that his wife has been murdered. Adapted as a film in 1951 by Alfred Hitchcock.
  70. spillane lonely

  71. * 1951. Mickey Spillane’s crime adventure One Lonely Night, in which ex-WWII assassin Mike Hammer so frightens a woman he was trying to rescue that she leaps to her death from a bridge. Discovering that the woman was a Communist, Hammer attends a meeting… and is mistaken for a spy from Moscow. Meanwhile, the FBI is searching for lost secret papers and the career of a popular politician is threatened.
  72. * 1952. Jim Thompson’s surreal crime adventure The Killer Inside Me. Lou Ford, a cliché-spouting deputy sheriff in a small Texas town, is secretly a sadistic sociopath. Stanley Kubrick’s blurb: “Probably the most chilling and believable first-person story of a criminally warped mind I have ever encountered.” Credited with spawning the serial-killer adventure sub-genre.
  73. innes candleshoe

  74. 1953. Michael Innes’s comical adventure Christmas at Candleshoe.
  75. 1953. Jim Thompson’s crime adventure Savage Night.
  76. levin kiss

  77. 1953. Ira Levin’s crime adventure A Kiss Before Dying.
  78. 1953. Davis Grubb’s crime adventure The Night of the Hunter.
  79. THE FIFTIES (1954–63)

  80. 1955. Patricia Highsmith’s crime adventure The Talented Mr. Ripley. The first in an acclaimed series of novels featuring a charming, guilt-free, opportunistic murderer who is never brought to justice.
  81. caper

  82. 1955. Lionel White’s crime adventure The Big Caper. Gave the “caper” genre its moniker.
  83. 1957. Chester Himes’s crime adventure For Love of Imabelle. The first of nine novels featuring black police detectives Coffin Ed Johnson and Gravedigger Jones.
  84. limetwig

  85. 1960. John Hawkes’s crime adventure (sorta) The Lime Twig concerns an attempt to steal a racehorse and run it under a false name. Along with John Barth’s Sot-Weed Factor, Nabokov’s Pale Fire, and Thomas Pynchon’s V., this is considered one of the novels that ushered in literary postmodernism.
  86. * 1962. Eric Ambler’s crime adventure The Light of Day. A petty crook in Athens, Arthur Abdel Simpson, preys on an international jewel thief — who blackmails him into driving a suspicious car across the Turkish border. Caught by the Turkish police, Simpson is coerced into spying on his erstwhile colleagues. Adapted by Jules Dassin as the light-hearted caper movie Topkapi.
  87. stark hunter

  88. * 1962. Richard Stark’s (Donald E. Westlake) crime adventure The Hunter. Parker, a brutal thief, is shot and left for dead by his partner and wife. He recovers, then embarks on a relentless quest to retrieve his money and get revenge. Westlake would write 23 other Parker novels over the next half-century; he is credited with having made it OK for readers to root for the bad guy. Adapted in 1967 as John Boorman’s excellent movie Point Blank.
  89. * 1963. Jim Thompson’s crime adventure The Grifters. A lollapalooza, in which a young con artist’s half-hearted efforts to go straight are stymied by his youthful con artist mother — who strongly resembles his girlfriend. Crime, sex, murder, crime, sex, impersonation, incestuous desire, murder. “There is no ease on Uneasy Street. The longer one’s tenancy, the more untenable it becomes.”
  90. THE SIXTIES (1964–73)

    pop1280

  91. 1964. Jim Thompson’s crime adventure Pop. 1280.
  92. 1964. John D. MacDonald’s Travis McGee crime adventure The Deep Blue Good-by. The first in a long, much-beloved series of pulp novels.
  93. leonard bounce

  94. 1969. Elmore Leonard’s crime adventure The Big Bounce. First of the author’s many crime thrillers.
  95. 1969. Chester Himes’s crime adventure Blind Man with a Pistol.
  96. THE SEVENTIES (1974–83)

    stone dog

  97. * 1974. Robert Stone’s crime adventure Dog Soldiers. Set in Vietnam and the United States, it concerns a heroin deal that goes violently awry. Its theme, meanwhile, is the decline of the promise of the Sixties: the death of the counterculture in America, mistrust of authority figures, and the end of youthful American optimism. Published in the cusp year of 1974, Stone’s book signals the emerging tone of Seventies-era adventure.
  98. 1974. William Goldman’s hunted-man adventure Marathon Man.
  99. jimmy_the_kid

  100. 1974. Donald E. Westlake’s crime adventure Jimmy the Kid.
  101. 1975. Ellen Raskin’s YA adventure The Tattooed Potato and Other Clues.
  102. dreadful-lemon-sky-the-1

  103. 1975. John D. MacDonald’s crime adventure The Dreadful Lemon Sky.
  104. * 1981. Jean-Patrick Manchette’s “neo-polar” crime adventure The Prone Gunman. Martin Terrier, a young hitman eager to retire, returns to his home town. There, he loses the woman he loves, the money he’s saved, the one friend he has left, and finally, his marksmanship. A violent, existentialist exploration of the human condition and French society; the author’s last completed novel. French cartoonist Jacques Tardi’s adaptation of The Prone Gunman is great; check out Fantagraphics Books’ 2011 English-language edition.
  105. 1982. Richard Condon’s crime adventure Prizzi’s Honor. A black comedy in which a mob hitman falls in love with his contract — also a hired killer.

***

TOP 450 ADVENTURES — BY SUBGENRE: 101 Science Fiction | 70 Crime | 65 Fantasy | 60 Espionage | 40 Atavistic & Historical | 25 Frontier & Western | 20 Avenger & Artful Dodger | 20 Apophenic & Treasure Hunt | 20 War & Ruritanian | 18 Picaresque | 11 Robinsonade & Survival |

20 ADVENTURE THEMES AND MEMES: Index to All Adventure Lists | Introduction to Adventure Themes & Memes Series | Index to Entire Series | The Robinsonade (theme: DIY) | The Robinsonade (theme: Un-Alienated Work) | The Robinsonade (theme: Cozy Catastrophe) | The Argonautica (theme: All for One, One for All) | The Argonautica (theme: Crackerjacks) | The Argonautica (theme: Argonaut Folly) | The Argonautica (theme: Beautiful Losers) | The Treasure Hunt | The Frontier Epic | The Picaresque | The Avenger Drama (theme: Secret Identity) | The Avenger Drama (theme: Self-Liberation) | The Avenger Drama (theme: Reluctant Bad-Ass) | The Atavistic Epic | The Hide-And-Go-Seek Game (theme: Artful Dodger) | The Hide-And-Go-Seek Game (theme: Conspiracy Theory) | The Hide-And-Go-Seek Game (theme: Apophenia) | The Survival Epic | The Ruritanian Fantasy | The Escapade

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KChung Radio Interview with Tosh Berman

Photo by Wallace Berman, 1959


http://www.kchungradio.org/archive/2013-11-08/Photo_Black_Soo_Kim_Lisa_Ohlweiler-11-08-2013.mp3


I did an interview on KChung Radio with Soo Kim and Lisa Ohlwiler with respect to a photograph that my father Wallace Berman took of me. 36:20 and somewhere in that time-frame the interview starts, but the whole show is interesting. All regarding the issues of photography.
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(via UK company aids conservationists with tiger facial…



(via UK company aids conservationists with tiger facial recognition system (Wired UK))

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“The racist white person doesn’t understand that he or she is also a race, it’s also constructed,…”

“The racist white person doesn’t understand that he or she is also a race, it’s also constructed, it’s also made, and it also has some kind of serviceability, but when you take it away. If I take your race away and there you are all strung out, and all you got is your little self and what is that? What are you without racism? Are ya any good? Are ya still strong? Still smart? You still like yourself?”

- Toni Morrison (via theraceproblem)
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Sparks at the Fonda Theater November 11, 2013


Last night I was transformed into another space that some can call "Sparks-Land."  The beauty of the performance was pitch-perfect. And without a doubt for the Sparks' fanatic.   Their current set is deep in the catalog, and it is almost like a secret message from artist to fan.  By no means was this a causal show, but more likely a current statement on Sparks circa 2014.  

The scary thing about the Sparks unit is that they keep getting stronger and stronger.  I know this sounds like a fan's insane rave, but the beauty of their shows is the way they look back into their most obscure tunes as well as the 'hit's songs and re-invent them in a new light.   These two artists don't compromise, it is take-me-all or not-at-all, and as a fan, it is great to take the giant leap with them into new territories. 

Russell Mael, at the moment, is at his best.  Physically as well as voice-wise.  The stage belongs to him as one who takes over the personal study in a stranger's house.  The space is is, and no one else.  Ron Mael handles the keyboards, and the show is a combination of music hall via the world of Sparks and a statement of an aesthetic that can't be better. The beauty of the relationship between the brothers blossoms as an one unit, unified in presenting work that will always be challenging, yet, solid as the great American songbook.   I have seen Sparks numerous times over the past decades, and this show may have been the best.  

The illustration above (and below) is a new box-set from Sparks.   It has to be an essential must-own. 


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Real Life Instagram







Real Life Instagram

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forfashionandthensome: Have you seen this cutie all over…















forfashionandthensome:

Have you seen this cutie all over tumblr/facebook/the world wide internet? 

Well my name hasn’t been attached to her much but yes, I took these shots. 

www.ariannaelizabeth.com

photographer: ME aka: arianna elizabeth

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shadowstookshape: Yashua Klos The Face on Mars, 2009



shadowstookshape:

Yashua Klos 
The Face on Mars, 2009

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