icancauseaconstellation: Joan Brossa



icancauseaconstellation:

Joan Brossa

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icancauseaconstellation: The Milanese. » Welded gas pipe…



icancauseaconstellation:

The Milanese. » Welded gas pipe cantilever pipe chair, Mart Stam, 1926.

on chairs

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emptiness-and-solitude: Parallels Follow My Blog For More ☥





















emptiness-and-solitude:

Parallels

Follow My Blog For More ☥

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The High Wire (17)

the-high-wire‘That’s a very brave scoundrel.’
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“APPLETON, Wis. — A woman who grew up here is getting her due and a little less harassment after…”

APPLETON, Wis. — A woman who grew up here is getting her due and a little less harassment after author John Green publicly resolved the mystery of a misattributed quote. Melody Truong posted the quote on her Tumblr page when she was 13 years old: “I’m in love with cities I’ve never been to and people I’ve never met.” Someone attributed the phrase to Green, a New York Times bestselling author known most recently for his book The Fault in our Stars.

….She was born in Long Beach, Calif., but her family moved to Appleton, where she grew up. She felt out of place when she wrote the now-famous words.

"There were a lot of times when I would think about this future place/city that I would be able to call home and be able to love and flourish in. I also had extreme wanderlust and still am very fascinated by the world and its cultures and people," she said.

Green’s company DFTBA (the abbreviation for ‘Don’t Forget to be Awesome’) recently started selling a poster with the quote.

"That’s when I felt like I should maybe speak up about the situation," Truong said.

DFTBA rectified the error by paying Truong royalties for the poster — those sold in the past or from now on. The company is also selling a piece of Truong’s artwork, for which she will receive all the royalties.

People harassed Truong online about the quote, but she said the angry messages decreased after Green explained the mix-up on YouTube….He didn’t remember writing the quote, “but then again I don’t remember writing a lot of Paper Towns — that book came out seven years ago,” he said in the video.

Green acknowledged the mistake, and took it as an opportunity to address fact-checking in the Internet age.



- Best-selling author reimburses student for quote
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installator: “It’s not every day that Van Gogh’s The Sunflowers…



installator:

"It’s not every day that Van Gogh’s The Sunflowers arrives in Dubai. Although this is an exact reproduction made using a highly technical 3D printer, it still holds instrinsic value." (thenational.ae)

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chaosophia218: Detail from “The Goetia: The Lesser Key of…



chaosophia218:

Detail from “The Goetia: The Lesser Key of Solomon the King.”

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Tetsumi Kudo

kudoCatastrophic collage boxes and birdcages.
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The Sunday Series: Sunday No. 7



Sunday no. 7

A Sunday in the park, and who knows what we will see or experience at Griffith Park.  My wife and I wandered through the park without a plan or thought in our head.   We didn’t even do it for exercise, but more of a thought that we can discover something new in our lives.   Even though it was a sunny morning, there was something dark about the way the plants greeted us as we enter its kingdom.   Park Rangers managed to put speakers throughout the park, where they played Brahms 4th Symphony, which I have to say, is one of my favorite pieces of music.   The grandness of the melodies in this specific symphony matched the moodiness of the park itself. 



As we walked past the abandoned or closed merry-go-round, I felt a tinge of fear in my chest. I didn’t say anything to my wife, because I didn’t want to admit to her what I was feeling.  I knew from the very moment I opened my eyes, that we would go for this walk.  I sought to put it off, but she was very convincing that this activity would be good for the both of us.  “a healthy body makes a healthy mind,” someone once said, and I’m not sure if the author of that quote is still here with us.  Nevertheless, the first sense that came to me was the smell of fresh horseshit on the dirt walking path.  I also understand why people walk together in these hills, because for one, it is very easy to get lost, and two, if you fall down a hill, you may stay there till death takes over. 


As we walked on the pathway, I was trying to imagine what is around the corner.  The total unknown aspect was slightly scary to me.   As we walked on the pathway to whatever it is, I kept hearing sounds on the side of the hill.   We stopped, and looked at the direction and I can make out what we think was a human figure behind a tree.  It didn’t move, so we didn’t move.  After awhile, we stood there silently and chose to move on.  Around the bend we saw what looked like a skeleton of a dead animal.  My wife thought it looked like a human’s skeleton, but I thought “No, that’s not possible.” I took a stick to move the bones around, and I was convinced that it was an animal, but it must have been a large animal.  Perhaps an ape?  Are there wild apes at Griffith Park?



As we went further down the pathway, we saw a side of the landscape that looked like it had small tunnels, but were actually holes.  Me, being me, wanted to stick my hand in the hole to see what would happen.   I did so, and I touched something that felt like fur, but also it seemed dead.  By instinct I tried to pull the fur object out of the hole, but it wouldn’t budge out of the tight area.  My wife told me to stop, and after 26 years of marriage I did so.  Still, once I pulled my hand out of the hole, I smelled my fingers and there was a scent on it that seemed like death to me.  Then again, it could have just been the smell of my clear nail polish. 



Nature being natural, always struck me as an artificial world.  Once a human stomps on the side of nature, it becomes a mere representation of what we think is “nature.” When I put my hand in the hole or perhaps it is even a gopher’s entrance to an inner world, I still wanted to touch something that was part of another world. Clearly I don’t belong here.  Nor does anyone else.   For nature to be natural, it needs to be separate from the rest of the urban world. 




As I write, I ‘m surrounded by plastic plants, because I like the idea of nature, but I prefer the representation of it.  For one, these artificial plants will never die.  And two, the death of nature is very disturbing to me.  I walk in the park, and all I see is death.  Beautiful death, but nevertheless, death.  
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Photo



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pixography: Thomas Woodruff ~ “Secret Charts” Woodruff’s good…















pixography:

Thomas Woodruff ~ “Secret Charts

Woodruff’s good friend, photographer Scott Heiser, was dying in the hospital.  Although his death was harrowing, Scott remained brave as his body transformed in ways Woodruff had not thought possible.  After Scott’s death, Woodruff began a series of 26 paintings—an alphabet of grief—in the form of scrolls, treasure maps, or floor cloths from some obscure secret fraternal society.  With attendant birds as a form of Greek chorus, the series was created in order from Figure A to Figure X.  Woodruff allowed himself to incorporate imagery from many sources, including cartoons, rebuses, freemasonry, and game boards.  In viewing the entire series, the traditional stages of grieving are hidden beneath the “skin” of each scroll.

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itscolossal: CT Scan of 1,000-Year-Old Buddha Statue Reveals…





itscolossal:

CT Scan of 1,000-Year-Old Buddha Statue Reveals Mummified Monk Hidden Inside

What looks like a traditional statue of Buddha dating back to the 11th or 12th century was recently revealed to be quite a bit more. A CT scan and endoscopy carried out by the Netherlands-based Drents Museum at the Meander Medical Centre in Amersfoort, showed the ancient reliquary fully encases the mummified remains of a Buddhist master known as Liuquan of the Chinese Meditation School. [more…]

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new-aesthetic: People walking around when talking on their…



new-aesthetic:

People walking around when talking on their mobile phone is a common behavior. Referred to as “Cell Trance” in the Urban Dictionnary2, this way of moving back and forth is often seen in public venues such as hallways, sidewalks, train platforms, bus stops or shopping malls. To onlookers, the erratic perambulation looks aimless, as if the caller is detached from his surroundings, absorbed in a private sonic universe.

From Curious Rituals, a book about “gestural interaction in the digital everyday”, by Nicolas Nova, Katherine Miyake, Waton Chiu and Nancy Kwon.

via Alexis Madrigal and Jesper Balslev

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Boxes of Organized Knowledge

A really lovely piece by Blake Morrison on Anthony Burgess as book reviewer.
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People walking around when talking on their mobile phone is a…



People walking around when talking on their mobile phone is a common behavior. Referred to as “Cell Trance” in the Urban Dictionnary2, this way of moving back and forth is often seen in public venues such as hallways, sidewalks, train platforms, bus stops or shopping malls. To onlookers, the erratic perambulation looks aimless, as if the caller is detached from his surroundings, absorbed in a private sonic universe.

From Curious Rituals, a book about “gestural interaction in the digital everyday”, by Nicolas Nova, Katherine Miyake, Waton Chiu and Nancy Kwon.

via Alexis Madrigal and Jesper Balslev

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Meridel Le Sueur

meridelThe world isn't worth selling your soul for.
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“Lichtenstein does not torture the paint”

Frederic Tuten on Roy Lichtenstein's studio:
Others could explain more precisely about his process. It started with an outline on the canvas for what would become the painting. He would fill in the spaces with colored paper cutouts, and tape them in place to see how they would look. He’d move the cutouts around until he decided what worked. There was a template for the dots too. So even before the actual painting process began there was a collage of how it would eventually look. His was the exact opposite of the Abstract Expressionists’ aesthetic, which was supposedly the personality of the artist declared on the canvas. His personality was in paintings, but certainly not bombastically so. Roy’s work was very organized, systematic, and intelligent. Nothing left to chance. It was all deliberate, like when he made the “Brushstroke” series. These paintings are a bit of a joke about Abstract Expressionism, because the brush stroke, the rhythm, the swipe, all that was premeditated—as if to say, this is how spontaneity can be engineered.
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“Brook your ire!”/toga-speech

At the FT, Simon Schama on what historians think of historical novels (site registration required):
Those who start in the thick of it, I like best of all. The writer who made me want to be an historian was Columbia University professor Garrett Mattingly. In 1959, he published The Defeat of the Spanish Armada, which has the imaginative grip of a novel but is grounded on the bedrock of the archives. It begins with a name the significance of which we, as yet, have absolutely no idea; with an exactly visualised place. Through the repetition of a single word “Nobody,” we hear the tolling of a bell ringing the doom of someone or other.
“Mr Beale had not brought the warrant until Sunday evening but by Wednesday morning, before dawn outlines its high windows, the great hall of Fotheringhay was ready. Though the Earl of Shrewsbury had returned only the day before nobody wanted any more delay. Nobody knew what messenger might be riding on the London road. Nobody knew which of the others might not weaken if they wanted another.”
What is this? Who is this? Where are we? You want to read on, don’t you? So you do so with the intense excitement of knowing every word is true.
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Closing tabs

Lost a very dear family member on Friday to cancer (metastatic melanoma, diagnosed in the days just before Christmas): my mother's husband Jim Kilik. Will write a proper memorial for him in a few days; in the meantime we are really just mourning (I will go to Philadelphia tomorrow to be with my mother for a bit).

I have accumulated a dreadful backlog of links and light reading: even the thought of logging it makes me want to lie down in a darkened room with a moist towel over my eyes! But it must be done before I can get my head around the many other writing-related things that need to happen round here....

Ta-Nehisi Coates on what he owed to David Carr.

Edward P. Jones profiled in the Washington Post.

Todd Gitlin on the enlightenment project.

A brief memorial for the linguist and novelist Suzette Haden Elgin, whose novel Native Tongue made a huge impression on me when I read it at age thirteen or fourteen.

The fantastical imagining of Hungarian paper money.

Eating chocolate in space.

Several independent things this past week prompted me to think of the lovely Eames Powers of Ten.

Inigo Thomas on Fattipuffs and Thinifers. NB this was a book I never actually read, though it was alluringly advertised in the back of some other Puffin children's books I must have had: I should see if I can actually get hold of it.

Art of the Afghan war rug.

Were the soldiers of the terracotta army based on individual people?

Using your cat to hack your neighbors' wifi (shades of "That Darn Cat").

Have been very busy reading things for work, but of course there is always time for some bits of light reading around the edges. Some of it inconsequential, some of it very good indeed.

FODDER of variable quality: Susan Hill, The Soul of Discretion (at first I wondered why I'd let this series drop, then I remembered the things I don't like about them!); Patricia Briggs' Sianim series; Holly Black, The Darkest Part of the Forest; Ned Beauman, Glow (impressive, agile, over-ingenious); Julie Schumacher, Dear Committee Members: A Novel (I have been avoiding this one as letters of recommendation are FAR TOO MUCH PART OF MY LIFE ALREADY, but really it is very good); Richard Powers, The Time of Our Singing (supreme comfort reread - the third-person narration doesn't work as well as I remembered, but the voice of the main narrator is incredible, and it's hard to imagine a book that feels more directly written to me - will perhaps now reread James Baldwin's Just Above My Head, which I think of as the secret twin/precursor); Emma Bull, War for the Oaks (another comfort reread); Paula Hawkins, The Girl on the Train (very depressing, but a decently good read); Simon Wood, The One That Got Away (just about above the bar of readability); Jim Gourley, The Race Within: Passion, Courage, and Sacrifice at the Ultraman Triathlon (afflicted by many of the problems that so much writing about endurance sport has - silly glorifying of what is often stupidity, annoying magazine-feature style of blow-by-blow narration, etc. but nonetheless a very good read - NB I think I do not need to do an Ultraman race, particularly not the Hawaii one, whose bike course just sounds dreadful!).

Then a few things I'll single out for particular recommendation:

Nina Stibbe's Love, Nina: A Nanny Writes Home is delightful (more here).

Top pick, a book I'm already sure is one of my favorites of the year: Daniel Galera, Blood-Drenched Beard. Dwight Garner's review was electrifying to me. Could there possibly be a novel more closely tailored to my particular loves? (Professional triathlete, sea swimming, whales and penguins, a dog as a main character, face-blindness [which I do not have, just relatively poor facial recognition skills, but I do have the matching thing where every place in the world looks the same to me], a Borges-Murakami access of slight mystical overtones....) Anyway, BEST BOOK EVER! Nice additional Galera bit here.

Ian MacLeod's The Summer Isles: very lovely, haunting, makes me want to reread Jo Walton's Farthing books as well.

Richard Price's The Whites, not perhaps as good as his very best books but really a great piece of work regardless (is it just me or does that elegiac breakneck narration of the opening grow wearisome as a narrative mode? He does it so well, but I am not sure it's something I really need more of in my reading life, it seems to express an orientation towards the present and the past that I can't really endorse - something overly sacral, reverential - I like the less elegiac version of similar in gonzo noir).

Last but not least, Atul Gawande, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. Painfully gripping - a good recommendation from my friend J. B., who comments that it should be required reading for anyone who hopes to grow old.
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Closing tabs

Lost a very dear family member on Friday to cancer (metastatic melanoma, diagnosed in the days just before Christmas): my mother's husband Jim Kilik. Will write a proper memorial for him in a few days; in the meantime we are really just mourning (I will go to Philadelphia tomorrow to be with my mother for a bit).

I have accumulated a dreadful backlog of links and light reading: even the thought of logging it makes me want to lie down in a darkened room with a moist towel over my eyes! But it must be done before I can get my head around the many other writing-related things that need to happen round here....

Ta-Nehisi Coates on what he owed to David Carr.

Edward P. Jones profiled in the Washington Post.

Todd Gitlin on the enlightenment project.

A brief memorial for the linguist and novelist Suzette Haden Elgin, whose novel Native Tongue made a huge impression on me when I read it at age thirteen or fourteen.

The fantastical imagining of Hungarian paper money.

Eating chocolate in space.

Several independent things this past week prompted me to think of the lovely Eames Powers of Ten.

Inigo Thomas on Fattipuffs and Thinifers. NB this was a book I never actually read, though it was alluringly advertised in the back of some other Puffin children's books I must have had: I should see if I can actually get hold of it.

Art of the Afghan war rug.

Were the soldiers of the terracotta army based on individual people?

Using your cat to hack your neighbors' wifi (shades of "That Darn Cat").

Have been very busy reading things for work, but of course there is always time for some bits of light reading around the edges. Some of it inconsequential, some of it very good indeed.

FODDER of variable quality: Susan Hill, The Soul of Discretion (at first I wondered why I'd let this series drop, then I remembered the things I don't like about them!); Patricia Briggs' Sianim series; Holly Black, The Darkest Part of the Forest; Ned Beauman, Glow (impressive, agile, over-ingenious); Julie Schumacher, Dear Committee Members: A Novel (I have been avoiding this one as letters of recommendation are FAR TOO MUCH PART OF MY LIFE ALREADY, but really it is very good); Richard Powers, The Time of Our Singing (supreme comfort reread - the third-person narration doesn't work as well as I remembered, but the voice of the main narrator is incredible, and it's hard to imagine a book that feels more directly written to me - will perhaps now reread James Baldwin's Just Above My Head, which I think of as the secret twin/precursor); Emma Bull, War for the Oaks (another comfort reread); Paula Hawkins, The Girl on the Train (very depressing, but a decently good read); Simon Wood, The One That Got Away (just about above the bar of readability); Jim Gourley, The Race Within: Passion, Courage, and Sacrifice at the Ultraman Triathlon (afflicted by many of the problems that so much writing about endurance sport has - silly glorifying of what is often stupidity, annoying magazine-feature style of blow-by-blow narration, etc. but nonetheless a very good read - NB I think I do not need to do an Ultraman race, particularly not the Hawaii one, whose bike course just sounds dreadful!).

Then a few things I'll single out for particular recommendation:

Nina Stibbe's Love, Nina: A Nanny Writes Home is delightful (more here).

Top pick, a book I'm already sure is one of my favorites of the year: Daniel Galera, Blood-Drenched Beard. Dwight Garner's review was electrifying to me. Could there possibly be a novel more closely tailored to my particular loves? (Professional triathlete, sea swimming, whales and penguins, a dog as a main character, face-blindness [which I do not have, just relatively poor facial recognition skills, but I do have the matching thing where every place in the world looks the same to me], a Borges-Murakami access of slight mystical overtones....) Anyway, BEST BOOK EVER! Nice additional Galera bit here.

Ian MacLeod's The Summer Isles: very lovely, haunting, makes me want to reread Jo Walton's Farthing books as well.

Richard Price's The Whites, not perhaps as good as his very best books but really a great piece of work regardless (is it just me or does that elegiac breakneck narration of the opening grow wearisome as a narrative mode? He does it so well, but I am not sure it's something I really need more of in my reading life, it seems to express an orientation towards the present and the past that I can't really endorse - something overly sacral, reverential - I like the less elegiac version of similar in gonzo noir).

Last but not least, Atul Gawande, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. Painfully gripping - a good recommendation from my friend J. B., who comments that it should be required reading for anyone who hopes to grow old.
Uncategorized

Closing tabs

Lost a very dear family member on Friday to cancer (metastatic melanoma, diagnosed in the days just before Christmas): my mother's husband Jim Kilik. Will write a proper memorial for him in a few days; in the meantime we are really just mourning (I will go to Philadelphia tomorrow to be with my mother for a bit).

I have accumulated a dreadful backlog of links and light reading: even the thought of logging it makes me want to lie down in a darkened room with a moist towel over my eyes! But it must be done before I can get my head around the many other writing-related things that need to happen round here....

Ta-Nehisi Coates on what he owed to David Carr.

Edward P. Jones profiled in the Washington Post.

Todd Gitlin on the enlightenment project.

A brief memorial for the linguist and novelist Suzette Haden Elgin, whose novel Native Tongue made a huge impression on me when I read it at age thirteen or fourteen.

The fantastical imagining of Hungarian paper money.

Eating chocolate in space.

Several independent things this past week prompted me to think of the lovely Eames Powers of Ten.

Inigo Thomas on Fattipuffs and Thinifers. NB this was a book I never actually read, though it was alluringly advertised in the back of some other Puffin children's books I must have had: I should see if I can actually get hold of it.

Art of the Afghan war rug.

Were the soldiers of the terracotta army based on individual people?

Using your cat to hack your neighbors' wifi (shades of "That Darn Cat").

Have been very busy reading things for work, but of course there is always time for some bits of light reading around the edges. Some of it inconsequential, some of it very good indeed.

FODDER of variable quality: Susan Hill, The Soul of Discretion (at first I wondered why I'd let this series drop, then I remembered the things I don't like about them!); Patricia Briggs' Sianim series; Holly Black, The Darkest Part of the Forest; Ned Beauman, Glow (impressive, agile, over-ingenious); Julie Schumacher, Dear Committee Members: A Novel (I have been avoiding this one as letters of recommendation are FAR TOO MUCH PART OF MY LIFE ALREADY, but really it is very good); Richard Powers, The Time of Our Singing (supreme comfort reread - the third-person narration doesn't work as well as I remembered, but the voice of the main narrator is incredible, and it's hard to imagine a book that feels more directly written to me - will perhaps now reread James Baldwin's Just Above My Head, which I think of as the secret twin/precursor); Emma Bull, War for the Oaks (another comfort reread); Paula Hawkins, The Girl on the Train (very depressing, but a decently good read); Simon Wood, The One That Got Away (just about above the bar of readability); Jim Gourley, The Race Within: Passion, Courage, and Sacrifice at the Ultraman Triathlon (afflicted by many of the problems that so much writing about endurance sport has - silly glorifying of what is often stupidity, annoying magazine-feature style of blow-by-blow narration, etc. but nonetheless a very good read - NB I think I do not need to do an Ultraman race, particularly not the Hawaii one, whose bike course just sounds dreadful!).

Then a few things I'll single out for particular recommendation:

Nina Stibbe's Love, Nina: A Nanny Writes Home is delightful (more here).

Top pick, a book I'm already sure is one of my favorites of the year: Daniel Galera, Blood-Drenched Beard. Dwight Garner's review was electrifying to me. Could there possibly be a novel more closely tailored to my particular loves? (Professional triathlete, sea swimming, whales and penguins, a dog as a main character, face-blindness [which I do not have, just relatively poor facial recognition skills, but I do have the matching thing where every place in the world looks the same to me], a Borges-Murakami access of slight mystical overtones....) Anyway, BEST BOOK EVER! Nice additional Galera bit here.

Ian MacLeod's The Summer Isles: very lovely, haunting, makes me want to reread Jo Walton's Farthing books as well.

Richard Price's The Whites, not perhaps as good as his very best books but really a great piece of work regardless (is it just me or does that elegiac breakneck narration of the opening grow wearisome as a narrative mode? He does it so well, but I am not sure it's something I really need more of in my reading life, it seems to express an orientation towards the present and the past that I can't really endorse - something overly sacral, reverential - I like the less elegiac version of similar in gonzo noir).

Last but not least, Atul Gawande, Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End. Painfully gripping - a good recommendation from my friend J. B., who comments that it should be required reading for anyone who hopes to grow old.
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Rachel Kushner (w/ comma poll)

From Rachel Kushner, The Flamethrowers:

I realized I’d been wrong.  She was not the pedigreed rich.  He was and she was not.  Sometimes all the information is there in the first five minutes, laid out for inspection. Then it goes away, gets suppressed as a matter of pragmatism. It’s too much to know a lot about strangers. But some don’t end up strangers. They end up closer, and you had your five minutes to see what they were really like and you missed it.

This is great!  My one question is about the commas in the last sentence.  If it had been me I probably would have omitted the comma after “closer,” but I sort of think Kushner’s version is better.  Then I wonder:  what about leaving the one after “closer” and adding another after “like”?

Hey, this is a good opportunity for a poll!  I’ve never put one in here before, let’s give this new WordPress functionality a swing.  (Non-standard comma used there on purpose, pedants.)


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bergtagen: KinFables





bergtagen:

KinFables

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Photo



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The Unconquerable (34)

macinnesThe Stranger
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hisdarknostalgia: John Jude Palencar



hisdarknostalgia:

John Jude Palencar

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Level 3 Communications began trading on NASAQ in 1998 and…



Level 3 Communications began trading on NASAQ in 1998 and received its franchise to build a fiber optic network in New York City in 1999. They are a major Tier 1 network, which means that their network has a direct connection to every other network online without paying fees to do so. In 2012, Level 3 received a $411 million contract from the Department of Defense’s Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) to provide fiber cable and maintenance support to DoD networks. This is just something that is interesting to know.

Seeing Networks: New York

When you think about or use the internet, what do you see?
For a lot of people, the answer is that they see screens–browsers, software, laptops, phones. Maybe they see some hardware in the form of a wifi router. The internet is a network, but individual users mostly just get a glimpse of it, usually by peering into black mirrors. The most popular stock photography of internet infrastructure–data centers full of servers and cables–tends to make the physical internet feel clinical, distant, opaque.
When I think about the internet, I think about scale. Computers used to be the size of entire rooms. While the hardware has gotten a lot smaller, the room has actually gotten bigger–we’re surrounded by sensors, cables, cameras, all the stuff of networks, and the number of networked objects around us is only going to increase. These pieces of the network are at times hard, but not impossible, to see–if you know what you’re looking for and how to look. And once you start looking, it’s hard to stop noticing all the pieces of networks that are around us all the time.
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new-aesthetic: Watch The Smithsonian 3D Print President Obama |…







new-aesthetic:

Watch The Smithsonian 3D Print President Obama | Business Insider

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Watch The Smithsonian 3D Print President Obama | Business…







Watch The Smithsonian 3D Print President Obama | Business Insider

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Odd Absurdum (5)

Dentist hlFamous for being Felix
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Dwayne McDuffie

mcduffietributecallHe revolutionized a colonial pop-culture genre.
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NEW WORK FOR BANG ON A CAN ALL-STARS

I’m excited to announce that on Thursday February 26, Bang On A Can All-Stars will premiere a new composition of mine here in NYC, as part of their People’s Commissioning Fund concert. I’ll be joining them on-stage. WNYC’s John Schaefer will host the event, which will live-stream on Q2.

The All-Stars will also perform new work by Ben Frost, Glenn Kotche (Wilco), and more. Really looking forward to this night. Tickets/info.

It’s part of the excellent Ecstatic Music Festival.

As a little warm-up, we put together a free Bandcamp download of work from all the composers. I gave my ‘Change the Mood’ mix from a few years back. Enjoy:

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White Northern Lights in Finland







White Northern Lights in Finland

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http://emotional-labor.email/Lighten up your email with the…



http://emotional-labor.email/

Lighten up your email with the Emotional Labor extension. Works on any email sent through Gmail. First write an email. Then click the smiley face to brighten up the tone of the email before sending.
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Photo



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We might garnish our messages with emoticons and emojis like…



We might garnish our messages with emoticons and emojis like strewing garland and bunting to demonstrate emotion. Sometimes that comes out naturally. But that fake smile, “yeah, things are going good,” way of deflecting attention, and containing unhappiness, plays out differently in written correspondence. When I attempt to display an emotion I don’t actually feel over email, I fret over sounding insincere or abrupt or otherwise upsetting someone unintentionally. That’s why I made this: the Emotional Labor email extension. Install it in Chrome, then click on the smiley face after composing an email in Gmail to brighten up the mood of the letter. It replaces serious words with playful ones, swaps out periods for exclamation marks, and a adds cheerful introductory text. — Canned Email: Let’s pretend the answer to email fatigue is more automation.

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Odd Absurdum (4)

Chair hlLikes and Hates
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historyvikings:Never fight unless you know the odds are in your…



historyvikings:

Never fight unless you know the odds are in your favor.

The gods look fondly upon you- Vikings returns to HISTORY Thursday at 10/9c.

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nitratediva: From Dracula (1931).



nitratediva:

From Dracula (1931).

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Photo



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the-two-germanys: Parsifal and the Flower MaidensWagner’s…



the-two-germanys:

Parsifal and the Flower Maidens

Wagner’s
Heroes

Constance Maud
Illus. by H. Granville Fell
London: Edward Arnold, 1904.

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Air Bridge (3)

innes thumb"Unless you can pay what is due on the mortgages I must foreclose."
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Fire Department Called After Robot Vacuum Attacks Sleeping…



Fire Department Called After Robot Vacuum Attacks Sleeping Owner’s Head

The fate of the mutinous robot is unknown.
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Odd Absurdum (3)

Court hlThe following
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palissades: Illustrations by Harry Clarke for Faust 1925 more













palissades:

Illustrations by Harry Clarke for Faust

1925

more

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new-aesthetic: “A family of deer has moved in next to the…



new-aesthetic:

"A family of deer has moved in next to the Council Bluffs, Iowa data center. In this photo, they are grazing by our cooling towers." 

Council Bluffs, Iowa – Data Centers – Google

(via: The cloud - Icon Magazine)

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“A family of deer has moved in next to the Council Bluffs, Iowa…



"A family of deer has moved in next to the Council Bluffs, Iowa data center. In this photo, they are grazing by our cooling towers." 

Council Bluffs, Iowa – Data Centers – Google

(via: The cloud - Icon Magazine)

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An Artist and a Helicopter Capture Google’s Off-Limits…



An Artist and a Helicopter Capture Google’s Off-Limits Data Farm | The Creators Project

If Google won’t let you document one of their data farms out in Oklahoma, what do you do? If you’re Irish artist John Gerrard, you hire a helicopter to fly out there and photograph it from the air. This aerial defiance informed one of the works in John Gerrard: Farm, a new solo exhibition from the artist at the Thomas Dane Gallery in London, where Gerrard has recreated ultra-realistic virtual representations of huge tech-industrial infrastructures that service our needs. […] Google calls their data centers “Where the internet lives,” and you’ve probably seen the photos of vast rooms housing brand-colored water pipes and cables, and rows of spaceship-like LED lit servers. For the center in Mayes County, Oklahoma—which Google sees as being an integral part of the community, providing jobs and investment—Gerrard produced a virtual replica of the one of buildings and the diesel generators and powerful cooling towers that sit on either side of it.
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The High Wire (16)

the-high-wire‘You amateur.’ It was the worst word he knew.
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Odd Absurdum (2)

Mic hlThirty minutes of fame, with commercials
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