The sorrows of gin

My former student Siobhan Phillips on women and the gin market.
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Values of the 19th century

At the Guardian, Stefan Collinis diagnosis after reading the latest volume of Isaiah Berlin's letters:
Berlin’s admirers are prone to say that there is mean-spirited, reverse snobbery at work in criticisms of his constant hobnobbing with the rich, powerful and well-connected. But the justifiable charge against him here is not that he liked the company of such people: it is that his cultivated intimacy with such circles habituated him into thinking of himself as being on the inside, able to pull strings and to drop a word in the ear of those with one kind of power or another without having to mount a properly argued case in public, which might then have been open to challenge. He enjoyed his insider status and he liked his opinions to have influence, but he hated to have to acknowledge them publicly or to be drawn into controversy over them. He undeniably possessed a streak of deviousness or even cowardice, and his genuinely liberal principles were often in tension with his equally deep need to be liked and admired.
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The Machine Stops (8)

machine stops thumbProgress had come to mean the progress of the Machine.
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The cyborg sensorium is possible because, as it turns out, the…



The cyborg sensorium is possible because, as it turns out, the human brain is quite happy to accept whole new forms of peripherals. Neuroplasticity, we now know, is the natural state of the brain; we’ve only just developed the technology to properly take advantage of it. It’s like we were always meant to merge completely with the machine world. To fuse into a new kind of organism.

via LOVECRAFTIAN CYBORGS AND THE ALIEN AESTHETIC: Part 1 – Cyborgs of the Abyss | Journal of a Cosmic Anthropologist

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Art Islands TOKYO 2015: Fashion Show by Lun*na Menoh

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okkultmotionpictures: 45C11 G047>|<



okkultmotionpictures:

45C11 G047

>|<

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keitanoaji: 肺があるから!!さんはTwitterを使っています: “個人的に狂気を感じる顔出し看板…



keitanoaji:

肺があるから!!さんはTwitterを使っています: “個人的に狂気を感じる顔出し看板 http://t.co/oPWonUn2ZL”

Personally feel the madness an appearance signboard 

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hifas: Fabiola by Francis Alÿs Fabiola is an installation of…









hifas:

Fabiola by Francis Alÿs

Fabiola is an installation of over 300 painted copies and reproductions of fourth century Saint-Fabiola, collected by Francis Alÿs from flea markets and antique shops throughout Europe and America in the last 20 years. They are all based on a now lost original painting by french artist Jean-Jacques Henner made in the nineteenth century.

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Digital Camouflage in China’s military parade to celebrate end…









Digital Camouflage in China’s military parade to celebrate end of WW2. Pictures via Guardian, PDDNet, Business Insider.

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Radium Age 100 (27)

1928_-_amazing_stories_-_buck_rogersE.E. "Doc" Smith's THE SKYLARK OF SPACE
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Pluperfect PDA (15)

postcard detailRingtone: "As Tears Go By"
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dori007:Just because they are way too cute and it made me…



dori007:

Just because they are way too cute and it made me giggle….

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Circle Game (7)

Click on image for larger versionTHE SECRET CIRCLE
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installator: “When a natural-history museum is renovated, what…



installator:

“When a natural-history museum is renovated, what happens to its inhabitants? Helge Skodvin captures some unusual removals at the University Museum of Bergen, and tells Samantha Weinberg about what he found.” (moreintelligentlife.com) [submitted by stenseven]

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Daniel Clowes — Against Groovy

ok clowesClowes is an avatar of a lost generation: The OGXers.
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(via Bonnie Hammer Talks Frankly About Growing Older As A Woman…



(via Bonnie Hammer Talks Frankly About Growing Older As A Woman In Hollywood | Deadline)

Amen!

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nitratediva: From The Great Ziegfeld (1936).



nitratediva:

From The Great Ziegfeld (1936).

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polychroniadis: Brutalist architecture built with Minecraft by…



polychroniadis:

Brutalist architecture built with Minecraft by Lindblumen.

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fairy-wren: Gang Gang Cockatoo. Photo by Ofer Levy



fairy-wren:

Gang Gang Cockatoo. Photo by Ofer Levy

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Revolution in the Head (5)

crowley thumbJohn Crowley's ENGINE SUMMER (1979)
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Jurgen (25)

jurgen thumbOf Compromises in Cocaigne
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Anthony Trollope’s preternatural power

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Personal time

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Oliver Sacks, 1933-2015

I have been steeling myself for the death of Oliver Sacks since he made his terminal illness public earlier this year, but it's still a hard one to process.

I never really met him personally (I saw him speak several times, and we exchanged letters), but he was my literary hero, and more than just a literary hero: more like my childhood hero Jane Goodall, I think, than like most of the many writers I've been obsessed with since, many of whom one couldn't really persuade oneself it would be actually enjoyable to meet (Gore Vidal, Anthony Burgess - I felt significantly reconciled to the fact that I never met Burgess before he died when I read Paul Theroux's "my other life/my secret history" piece about AB).

I found so many things to love in Sacks's last memoir (powerlifting!), but one thing I didn't really write about in that post is the way that Sacks inspires me because he is both hero and everyman: his struggles with depression and weight gain and substance abuse, his wrestling with his sexuality, his long periods of self-dissatisfaction are balanced out by his joy in the natural world, his remarkable empathy, his love for music and his lucid literary intelligence. What a life!

Some links:

Here's what I wrote in Bookforum some years ago about his hallucinations book.

A delightful NYT bit from 2008.

Maria Popova's thoughts on the recent memoir (great pictures).

I am 90% certain that Oliver Sacks had a membership at Chelsea Piers, unless it was some other increasingly frail elderly Englishman who swam there so regularly. I did not want to accost him and introduce myself, not least in case I was mistaken but mostly because I didn't want to bother him! But I wished I could invite him to come to our powerlifting club at the "Iron Arena" by the sand volleyball court. I think he would have liked the vibe...

We had one good friend in common, a friend who died about six months after I met him but who left an indelible impression on me. That is swimming teacher and life coach extraordinaire Doug Stern, who I wrote about here and also here in connection with Sacks.

Doug was a remarkable person. I signed up for his deep-water running sessions when I had to stop running due to a stress-fracture (this was about 1.5 years into my mega-fitness mid-30s transition), and I knew right away - THIS WAS THE GUY WHO WOULD TEACH ME HOW TO SWIM PROPERLY SO THAT I COULD START DOING TRIATHLONS! It was all wrapped up in a slew of emotions, distress about the stress fracture and then more intensely distress at my friend Helen Hill's murder, which happened the first week of January 2007 and which sent me into a mental tailspin. Signing on for swimming lessons with Doug was like entering a magical new world, a refuge from real life but also something more real than life itself usually feels.

But Doug had something wrong with his shoulder and neck that turned out to be cancer, and those lessons that spring were bittersweet due to his frighteningly rapid physical decline. (I remember staying after the session one time because Doug wanted to get in the pool and he'd promised family members he wouldn't swim without someone else present, but he had lost so much fat and muscle that it was too cold for him to stay in: he had to get out after just a few minutes, it was heartbreaking.)

Doug was anxious to tell his life story, and I sat down with him and a tape recorder for one initial session. He was too sick after that to record anything more, and the piece (which I shared with his family and a few friends) had to stand alone. He talked about being a patient in hospital, empathy, pain, life, death and bicycles.

(Links: Tom Demerly wrote this letter to Doug after Doug first got the cancer diagnosis; here's Doug on arm recovery; and here's a memorial thread for Doug on the Slowtwitch forum.)

Doug ran an annual swim camp in Curacao. I was hugely keen to attend - only Doug died, and also I am romantically involved with a fellow who lives on another Caribbean island, so there was no way it made sense to go there for the swim trip the following year (January is my precious Cayman time), though his friends and swimmers kept it going.

But I was tantalized by my knowledge (I am a person of the internet, Google is one of my natural senses!) that Oliver Sacks had once written a short piece about the Curacao swim camp, and I got up my nerve to write Dr. Sacks a letter in which I enclosed a copy of Doug's thoughts and asked him whether he had access to the old story in Triathlete magazine, which not all the powers of Columbia library access and internet persistence seemed to be able to grant me.

This is what I got back in the mail. (I've transcribed the text at the bottom.)


Jan 3/10
Dear Jenny Davidson.

Thank you for writing to me - and especially for sending me that immensely moving, and utterly Doug-like, comment/conversation with Doug about being disabled, trussed up, losing muscle and strength, foreseeing his end, being maddened by the stupid rituals of the hospital (being woken at 2AM to have one's BP taken, etc), but, equally, his characteristic efforts + power to make personal, human contact with his fellow-patients - his nurses, his doctors etc. --

I enclose a copy of the "Triathlete" piece I wrote in 1997.

Perhaps I will see you in Curacao one year, tho' I am still somewhat disabled myself at this point from two operations (L knee replacement, R hemilaminectomy) on top of each other.

With all good wishes,
Oliver

And the article itself:
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Revolution in the Head (4)

burroughs thumbWilliam Burroughs's NOVA EXPRESS (1964)
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Katrina

Nothing much to say, only it's been much on my mind these past few weeks. The event itself is especially clearly marked in my mind because it was the week I moved into a rather desolate and lonely sublet year in Cambridge, Massachusetts; I felt unanchored there, but also shamed by the much more profound exodus I saw on television.

(That was the only year in adulthood that I've lived with broadcast television, and I am sure the scenes are more strongly seared onto my mind for that reason; I think I stayed calmer than many, during the months after 9/11, by dint of consuming news only through newspapers and a dial-up internet connection.)

Just sharing a few pieces (old and new) by friends more immediately affected than I was:

Alan Chin was on site taking photographs.

Phillip Dyess-Nugent wrote this piece about the friend we both lost in Katrina's long aftermath.

And a lovely song I can't listen to without tears flooding into my eyes, the inimitable Pete Sturman's "Wasn't Plannin' on Leavin'" - you can hear it at that link, don't miss it....
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Closing tabs

Pictures of chickens.

Goat Uber, a.k.a. Rent-a-Ruminant.

Julia Cheiffetz had a baby and cancer while working at Amazon.

Ten steps to PhD failure. (The book is 57 Ways to Screw up In Grad School: Perverse Professional Lessons for Graduate Students, and I have already ordered a copy.)

Light reading round-up (as always, I seesaw between panic that I will never again find anything good to read and huge relief when I come upon mention of something appealing - have just downloaded a good new batch of stuff and feel relatively calm about it just now!):

John L. Parker, Jr., Once a Runner (not sure why I didn't come across this one sooner - it's very good fun - a bit melodramatic, but a nice companion for In Lane Three, Alex Archer!);

Chuck Wendig, Zeroes (good, but the premise and storyline are perhaps overly familiar by now);

Karin Slaughter, Blonde Hair, Blue Eyes (I find this "teaser" approach for new crime fiction woefully effective - now gnashing my teeth waiting for Pretty Girls - ditto the delectable Small Wars, teaser for the forthcoming Jack Reacher novel Make Me, which will be my reward after my first day of teaching - assuming I am not so greedy as to read it on the Tuesday night before my first lecture);

The first two books in Hakan Nesser's Inspector Van Vetteren series, a good tip from Jane Y.;

Ruth Ware, In a Dark, Dark Wood (I liked this quite a bit, but I wished it hadn't been told in flashback/memory loss mode - I think the story could have stood on its own);

Ellis Avery's second installment in her Family Tooth series, On Fear, about which my only complaint is that it's much too short, I want to read a whole book's worth of this;

Nick Holdstock, The Casualties (odd, appealing);

Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven (I really, really liked it, despite the way it's almost too much of the zeitgeist - shades of Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play! - I've had it on my Kindle for a while, and I guess I was holding out against it because I am suspicious of "literary" novels that get singled out for "genre" content/acclaim, but I should have read it sooner, I liked the earlier book of hers I read and this one is exceptionally good);

And my top pick from this batch, a really wonderful trilogy by Robin LaFevers (this was a recommendation from Sara Ryan), the His Fair Assassin trilogy. I love these! They have some of the appeal of Jacqueline Carey's Kushiel's Dart series, only much less sex (for me this is a plus); really, really appealing historical fantasy.

The two other posts I am going to write now are more mournful (Oliver Sacks, Katrina).
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Closing tabs

Pictures of chickens.

Goat Uber, a.k.a. Rent-a-Ruminant.

Julia Cheiffetz had a baby and cancer while working at Amazon.

Ten steps to PhD failure. (The book is 57 Ways to Screw up In Grad School: Perverse Professional Lessons for Graduate Students, and I have already ordered a copy.)

Light reading round-up (as always, I seesaw between panic that I will never again find anything good to read and huge relief when I come upon mention of something appealing - have just downloaded a good new batch of stuff and feel relatively calm about it just now!):

John L. Parker, Jr., Once a Runner (not sure why I didn't come across this one sooner - it's very good fun - a bit melodramatic, but a nice companion for In Lane Three, Alex Archer!);

Chuck Wendig, Zeroes (good, but the premise and storyline are perhaps overly familiar by now);

Karin Slaughter, Blonde Hair, Blue Eyes (I find this "teaser" approach for new crime fiction woefully effective - now gnashing my teeth waiting for Pretty Girls - ditto the delectable Small Wars, teaser for the forthcoming Jack Reacher novel Make Me, which will be my reward after my first day of teaching - assuming I am not so greedy as to read it on the Tuesday night before my first lecture);

The first two books in Hakan Nesser's Inspector Van Vetteren series, a good tip from Jane Y.;

Ruth Ware, In a Dark, Dark Wood (I liked this quite a bit, but I wished it hadn't been told in flashback/memory loss mode - I think the story could have stood on its own);

Ellis Avery's second installment in her Family Tooth series, On Fear, about which my only complaint is that it's much too short, I want to read a whole book's worth of this;

Nick Holdstock, The Casualties (odd, appealing);

Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven (I really, really liked it, despite the way it's almost too much of the zeitgeist - shades of Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play! - I've had it on my Kindle for a while, and I guess I was holding out against it because I am suspicious of "literary" novels that get singled out for "genre" content/acclaim, but I should have read it sooner, I liked the earlier book of hers I read and this one is exceptionally good);

And my top pick from this batch, a really wonderful trilogy by Robin LaFevers (this was a recommendation from Sara Ryan), the His Fair Assassin trilogy. I love these! They have some of the appeal of Jacqueline Carey's Kushiel's Dart series, only much less sex (for me this is a plus); really, really appealing historical fantasy.

The two other posts I am going to write now are more mournful (Oliver Sacks, Katrina).
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Radium Age 100 (26)

PC04-C2Arthur Conan Doyle's WHEN THE WORLD SCREAMED
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The Coin Game, II

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Revolution in the Head (3)

scanner thumbPhilip K. Dick's A SCANNER DARKLY (1977)
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Tosh Berman Interview with 3: AM Magazine


An interview I did on the 3:AM Magazine website.  Pretty extensive.  With my publisher Rebekah Weikel (Penny-ante editions) 

http://www.3ammagazine.com/3am/art-is-love-is-god/
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The Sunday Series: Sunday August 30, 2015 – Izu Ōshima, Tokyo, Japan



The Sunday Series
Sunday, August 30, 2015 (Izu Ōshima, Tokyo, Japan)

I began to write my own obituary, because I don’t feel I will make it off this island.  The fact that the local (and prominent volcano) Mount Mihara is fully active and ready to blow at a second’s notice, and on top of that, there is a major earthquake fault underneath the island.  Every where I go on this island I’m reminded of death.  On a walk, I came upon a monument and a little shrine that announced a plane crash that took place here which killed 30 people.   In another walk, there was another shrine that honored the 35 people who were victims of a mudslide due to the typhoon that hit the island three years ago.   And just before we arrived here, a plane went down and crashed into a house, killing the occupant, who by chance, just moved into the house.  The volcano itself, attracted hundreds to commit suicide by jumping into the lava filled crater.  The cruel joke is that one wished to be swallowed by the earth, but in fact, when you jump in, lava keeps you floating and you just burn to death by the steam coming out of your body.  Death here is no joke.

So, if you look at this statistically, I have a 50/50 chance of making it alive from Ōshima.  To be on the safe side, and concerned about not having the last word on my life, and not having the time to finish off the full memoir called “Tosh’s Unfortunate Life,” I decided to, at the very least, to write my own obituary.   Here it is:

Tosh Berman (August 25, 1954 - Sunday August 30, 2015)

Born in Los Angeles and died in Izu Ōshima, Tokyo, Japan

“Tosh Berman was a writer, poet, publisher, and gentleman.  The son of Wallace Berman and Shirley Berman.  He went to school, but the school denied that he was ever a student.   Nevertheless he never let a locked door stop him from getting a full education.   In school, Tosh had a deep interest in whatever was happening outside the classroom.  This leads him to fail Kindergarten, and he had to take that class twice.  By the second time, he realized that the school world wasn’t made for his liking.   At eleven years old, he wrote his own book of poetry “My Life, My World, My Everything” that was published in an edition of one on a notebook that his parents gave him.   Due that the hand-printed manuscript was extremely hard to read, the author is the only one to actually read the book of poems.  Even with that, Tosh gave the book a superb blurb in the back of the notebook: “Poetry is real, and this is the real deal” - Tosh Berman, Poet (author of “My Life, My World, My Everything.”)



As a teenager it could be thought of that he discovered girls, but the fact is, girls discovered Tosh.  They found him peeking through various keyholes and windows in selective residences where pretty teenage girls were found to be residing.   Being caught on a regular basis, Tosh learned to use language as not only as a tool, but also a weapon.  The girls became wary of him when he claimed he was looking for his glasses in various suspicious locations.    By the age of seventeen, he was lead tambourine player for the band “Knock Knock Who’s There.” They were the no. 1 band at Louisville High School in Woodland Hills and had a sizable female audience, due to the fact that it was an all-girl school.   Tosh became a fixture at this educational institution, and his one goal in his life at the time, was to become a janitor at the school.  Fate had other plans for him, for instance, he was kicked out of the band due to his reckless dancing, and insisting on having a microphone on stage, which in fact, he didn’t sing at all.

Tosh, it was reported, was a very bitter young man.   He seemed to drink only liquids that had a tang taste, and usually had a puckered gesture around the mouth area.   That look was quite iconic on him, and eventually many people imitated his look by holding their puckered lips together.  Since then, Tosh started to have a following - mostly guys who couldn’t function in the world, and were often called dreamers by the local High School football team.  Tosh was known for his militant “no exercise” stance, that he kept up till his death.   He deeply felt that one should read a book instead of doing exercise.  Or if one needs to do for exercise, they can clearly do so by reaching for a book on the top shelf, or do deep knee bends, when the book is located on the bottom shelf of the bookcase.

  

It was only at the age of 21, Tosh decided to get a job, due that the parents refused to feed him till he found occupation.  He went to the first record store, and got the job there, when he could name every member of Freddie and the Dreamers (Roy Crewdson on guitar, Derek Quinn on guitar and harmonica, Peter Birell bass, Bernie Dwyer drums and of course, Freddie Garrity on lead vocals and lead dancing).  Tosh was profoundly moved when he read a quote from Freddie saying “The Dreamers and I have always been daft.  You couldn’t call me a sex-idol, could you?  Collectively, we’re no glamour boys.”



Tosh worked at a record store on Sherman Way in Reseda from the beginning of March 1975 to the end of March 1975.  He often commented on the enjoyment of various porn actresses who worked as a stripper on the side, would come in to get music for their act.  Tosh showed choreographed talents when he recommended the would-be strippers on how to do some of the movements.  He was eventually let-go of the job due to his naturally suggestive sexual movements while working at the store.  Customers and the fine-looking women who worked with him didn’t complain, but the city council of Reseda took notice, and requested that he be removed from the job.  Normally something like this would discourage Tosh’s love of music, but alas, it only became stronger, when he devoted his life to various punk rock clubs around Los Angeles.



It was at this time, he became a professional friend to bands such as DEVO and The Weirdos.  He would make sure the right drinks were in the right glasses, and kept the bands safe from the Los Angeles Police Department as well as the over-zealous female fans.   He would often read poetry out-loud in the dressing rooms to calm the musicians’ nerves before hitting the stage.  It has been noted that DEVO’s Mark Mothersbaugh would request Tosh to read Frank O’Hara’s poem about drinking a coke.  To add to the effect, Tosh would serve Mark a glass of Coke as he read the poem to him. Tosh realized that this wasn’t a good career move, due that there’s no payment in what he was doing, so he decided to devote himself to the business world of making and writing poetry.   Here he made his fame and fortune.



Tosh as an adventurer (both sexually as well as a world traveler) became an obsessed collector of rare petrified mummies that were caught in the lava flow of various volcano eruptions.  His obsession with Mount Mihara, on the island of Oshima, one of the seven Izu islands off of, but still part of Japan, had an active volcano.   In fact, a girl he was dating with at the time, Kiyoko Matsumoto, jumped into the flames of Mihara, when he refused to take her out for shaved ice near the black beaches on the island.  She survived the suicide attempt, even though she did lose some inches in height wise.



Tosh settled down in the town of Moji-Ko, and married a girl from the area.  Here, he found a publisher, Cole Swift & Sons, who had offices not only in Moji-Ko, but also in Bombay, London, and Paris.  With them, he produced his first book of poems “The Plum in Mr. Blum’s Pudding.” The entire book was written in Moji-Ko, with a broken typewriter that couldn’t type the letter “E” due to the malfunction of the typewriter. It became the first book of poetry that doesn’t use the capital letter “E” nor a small “e.” This of course, caused a great deal of controversy in the Poetry World.  For a little awhile it was banned in all countries that have a letter E in their country’s name.  The scandal even touched Tosh personally, when for about a month or two he was known as “Tosh Brman.” (The “e” was removed from his last name).



Banned from writing poetry and told to be kept away from all workable typewriters, Tosh decided to start up a press TamTam Books, that focused on post-war French writing.  At the time, he started this press, no one was interested in the writer Boris Vian, so, he devoted his finances and time to promote the works of Vian. Not surprisingly, no one was interested in Boris Vian when he closed his press.   Therefore it was a major disappointment for him when he got turned down the highest French medal of honor, but also he couldn’t get a visa to visit France.   In fact, he became banned in France.  With that in mind, Tosh wrote his last book “Sparks-Tastic” that became an instant classic for the Kindle set.   It seemed that Kindle would malfunction whenever it tried to download the non-fictional work.  With a string of failures in his background and clearly, nothing was going to happen in his future, Tosh decided to move to Izu Ōshima, where he became a manager of the Innomaru House, an inn and a house of loose women who served not only the local population but also customers from the mainland.   It was here when he….”

This is where I had to finish off the obituary, because at this time, I’m not sure what or how my “ending” will happen.  Fate often knocks on my door, and it is that fateful moment where I either go with the wind, or against it.

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The coin game

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No Man’s Land (14)

cavern thumbI sent a bullet through the right eye of the first thing that came on.
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The UN Is Using Virtual Reality to Make the Rich and Powerful…





The UN Is Using Virtual Reality to Make the Rich and Powerful Feel Empathy | Motherboard

Heads of state, billionaire donors and other decision makers make up a key intended audience for these films. In the first UN VR doc, Clouds Over Sidra, a young Syrian girl takes viewers on a poignant tour of the Za’atari refugee camp where she lives. Its first screening was held at the World Economic Forum in Davos where some of the world’s wealthiest and most powerful people donned headsets to experience a slice of displaced life in Syria.

In his former role as a senior policy advisor at the UN, Arora says he saw first-hand the disconnect that can exist between the powerful and those who live with the consequences of their decisions.

“I think a lot of these people, even when they would go into Za’atari Camp or someplace like that, it’s with an entourage,” he says. “I just didn’t feel like they were really, truly understanding what it’s like to walk in someone else’s shoes, and I think that all of them need to.”

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A Prayer: ‘Drunk Drunk Emperor,’ 10 Years After Katrina

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A Prayer: ‘Drunk Drunk Emperor,’ 10 Years After Katrina

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Palmyra is rapidly becoming the symbol of Isis’s cultural…



Palmyra is rapidly becoming the symbol of Isis’s cultural iconoclasm.

If Isis is permitted to wipe the slate clean and rewrite the history of a region that defined global aesthetic and political sensibilities, we will collectively suffer a costly and irreversible defeat.

But there is hope. By placing the record of our past in the digital realm, it will lie for ever beyond the reach of vandals and terrorists.

– ROGER MICHEL, IDA DIRECTOR

Scientists launch hi-tech plan to save ancient Middle East relics from Islamic State

In collaboration with UNESCO World Heritage and the epigraphical database project at NYU’s Institute for the Study of the Ancient World and engineering specialists at Oxford University, we hope to capture one million 3D images of at-risk objects by the end of 2016.  To that end, we have created a heavily modified version of an inexpensive consumer 3D camera that will permit inexperienced users to capture archival-quality scans.  The camera has the facility to upload these images automatically to database servers where they can be used for study or, if required, 3D replication.  It is our intention to deploy up to five-thousand of these low-cost 3D cameras in conflict zones throughout the world by the end of 2015.

The Million Image Database Project - Institute of Digital Archaeology

More on Digital Archeology: Indiana Joneses run hi-tech race against Islamic State - BBC

[Image is a LIDAR scan of Angkor Wat, Cambodia, via Discover Magazine]

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